This month's topics: WEFTEC Preview • Filtration • Biosolids • Industrial Reuse

August 2019 • Volume 31 • Number 8

This month's featured content

Investing with Recycled Water
Nampa, Idaho, pursues hidden economic development tool
Matthew Gregg

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Finding Filter Fixes
Improving tertiary sand filter performance through maintenance and operational upgrades
John E. Koch and Karen Bill

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Positioning Your Product for Sales Success
Are you treating your biosolids product like an asset or a liability?
Ron Alexander

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Reuse Partnerships — A Water Supply Win-Win
Aligning business drivers to create partnerships between municipalities and refineries
Nick Johnson

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Features

Investing with Recycled Water
Nampa, Idaho, pursues a hidden economic development tool
Matthew Gregg

Recycled water has long been viewed as a tool to further water supplies and find better uses for highly treated water. This concept has evolved during the last several decades with a focus on finding more beneficial environmental uses for the water. Current projects, such as the city of San Diego Pure Water Program, have even proposed taking this as far as supplementing potable water supplies.

The city of Nampa, Idaho, has looked at recycled water through a different lens — a potential tool to drive economic development within the community. While the effect of this benefit is less direct and, therefore, less easily quantified than increasing local water resources, the long-term community benefits can be tremendous.

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Finding Filter Fixes
Improving tertiary sand filter performance through maintenance and operational updates
John E. Koch and Karen Bill

Given that sand filters are typically robust and easy to operate, routine and annual maintenance can be overlooked. Attention to the filter process is elevated when changes in effluent total suspended solids (TSS), 5-day biochemical oxygen demand/chemical oxygen demand (BOD5/COD), phosphorous, and turbidity limits are being approached or exceeded.

Simple, routine observation and maintenance can help keep these critical, but sometimes neglected and overlooked, filters operating successfully and improve effluent quality. Filter cleaning and optimization can be implemented quickly and without a large expense when periodic observations and inspections are regularly performed.

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Positioning Your Product for Sales Success
Are you treating your biosolids product like an asset or a liability?
Ron Alexander

There is increased interest in producing biosolids-based products that can be used in non-agricultural applications, and many factors affect their marketability. Obviously, producing a product (compost, dried/granulates, Class A blended soil, etc.) that possesses the characteristics required for a specific application, or end user group, is key to the success of any marketing program. As is providing a competitive price, good customer service, technical assistance and managing any negative stigmas. However, without providing the appropriate amount of sales and marketing activity, these other efforts alone will not likely increase the product’s marketability or market share.

Having researched why certain biosolids-based products succeed and fail in the marketplace, one fact seems very clear: Most facilities that do not invest time, effort, and money into market development and those that do not take it seriously enough fail much more frequently.

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Reuse Partnerships – A Water Supply Win-Win
Aligning business drivers to create partnerships between municipalities and refineries
Nick Johnson

Historically, water has been a low-cost, low-consideration utility for many petroleum refiners. However, as water rates have increased and water stress has become prevalent, refiners have been forced to closely examine their water use and seek alternative water sources.

Municipal wastewater effluent is an intriguing water source for refiners trying to reduce their reliance on traditional water sources, but coming to a reuse agreement with a municipality is not without challenges. Many discussions regarding water reuse begin with great intentions, but never produce an agreement due to failure to address the key business drivers of all stakeholders.

Fortunately, a number of shared concerns and external factors can push the parties into alignment, and these key drivers can serve as catalysts for reaching agreements.

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News

Assessing Affordability
As water rates continue to rise, utilities seek to ensure that such increases remain affordable for all customers
Jay Landers

In recent years, many water and wastewater utilities have had to raise their rates well beyond the rate of inflation. Whether the result of regulatory requirements, the need to replace aging infrastructure, or other demands, these rate increases can exceed the ability of some customers to pay. In such cases, utilities must confront the delicate question of how to generate necessary additional revenue without harming those least able to afford higher rates.

Such questions often arise as a result of consent decrees or other regulatory actions that necessitate significant rate increases over time. Although the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has guidelines to determine whether water and wastewater rates are affordable for a given community, some observers maintain that the guidelines fail to account for the full range of factors that determine affordability. 

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Drug Seeking Behavior
Wastewater reveals the truth about drug use and intervention programs
Cathy Chang

Wastewater epidemiology is a growing field of study that uses municipal wastewater to track human diseases, especially addiction disorders such as drug abuse. By analyzing wastewater for prescription and  illegal drugs (and their metabolites), cities around the world can get a candid picture of local drug use and the effectiveness of treatment and prevention campaigns.

Getting greater insight on the drug use in communities is valuable information to protect the environment as well as humans. These contaminants eventually end up in rivers, oceans, and groundwater after being released in treated effluent. A recent study published in Environmental Pollution reported high concentrations of cocaine found in water samples taken off the coast of Quintana Roo, a Mexican state off the Yucatan Peninsula.

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WEFTEC Preview

The 2019 Water Environment Federation technical exhibition and conference (WEFTEC®) returns to Chicago, Sept. 22–Sept. 25 at McCormick Place. 

Browse this month's preview coverage and download a full PDF of the section below to learn more.

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Do You Speak Water?
Opening General Session speaker to illustrate how the power of language supports innovation
Justin Jacques

Research & Rivalry at WEFTEC 2019
Learning and competition go together in Chicago this September
Justin Jacques & Steve Spicer

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Download full WEFTEC Preview section

From the Editors

WEFTEC® Season Begins!

Here at Water Environment Federation headquarters, all eyes have begun to turn toward putting the finishing touches on WEFTEC. The educational programming is nearly complete with 148 technical sessions and 27 workshops slated. Not to mention all the other programming that takes place in other locations such as the Innovation Pavilion and Stormwater Pavilion. The exhibition is filling up fast, too. At press time, there are more than 960 exhibitors signed up to cover more than 292,500 ft2 of space.

The WEFTEC Preview section that starts on p. 37 includes some highlights of what WEFTEC will deliver. As the official magazine of WEFTEC, choosing what to include here is always a challenge. We only have so much room, yet everything at WEFTEC already is curated carefully. In fact, only about 40% of submissions are accepted for the technical program. (You can read about the selection process from WEFTEC Program Committee chair Diego Rosso and Vice Chair Tom Sandy online at www.wef.org/BTS.)

We settled on the theme of Research & Rivalry. Each of these pursuits seek to advance the water sector. Research (p. 40), in the broad sense, can take many forms such as diving deep into a technical topic, exploring new equipment to solve a problem, or experimenting with a new communications practice to tell customers about your good work. Rivalry (p. 41) refers to the many competitions held at WEFTEC. The competitors in Operations Challenge, the Intelligent Water Systems Challenge, and Student Design Competition all embody the drive to make things better.

There’s much more to WEFTEC that we couldn’t include in this issue; and we’ll share some more highlights next month. But to get the full picture visit www.WEFTEC.org.

— The editors

Letters

‘Operations & Engineering’ Side by Side

A great improvement to the Water Environment Federation and Water Environment & Technology by combining operations and engineering in your magazine’s title. I have been in the water/wastewater field for over 45 years first as a chemist, then as Class D/IV Operator and now as a registered professional engineer. Over that span I have personally designed over 100 projects that involved new or improved water and wastewater facilities. 100% of the time I involved the operator of record in the design process for obvious reasons but one that made these projects successful — i.e. for the operator to take ownership. My recommendation to all design engineers: Require the operator to be involved!

Doug Ralston, PE
Technical Director of Environmental Engineering
Engineering Resources Inc. (Fort Wayne, Ind.) 

 

May Issue Splash Shot Makes a Splash

I loved your article about the Wachusett Reservoir! I was delighted to learn the back story about it in the article because I’m originally from the nearby city of Worcester, Mass. My relatives lived in Clinton, Mass., so I spent my childhood gazing out the window at the reservoir and dam as we drove to and from their houses for visits. Maybe that was the start of my career in water.

I look forward to sharing the article with my Massachusetts relatives!

Beth Dutton
Deputy Director
3 Rivers Wet Weather (Pittsburgh)

Viewpoint

Forcing Investments Down the Drain
The case for why we need federal water reuse regulations sooner rather than later
Ed Sharood and Hugh Tozer

The current regulatory environment limits industrial water reuse and restricts sustainability efforts for some life sciences manufacturers. The absence of federal guidelines and conflicting local regulations leave manufacturers to grapple with the consequences.

A life sciences manufacturer (LSM), which has operated in the northeastern U.S. for decades, is no stranger to water purification and reuse. It operates several reverse osmosis (RO) processes to produce water for manufacturing and utilizes the rejected water to flush the facility’s toilets. Although the region where the facility is located is water rich, the LSM’s water reuse has lowered its water and sewer costs and ensured access to an essential resource for operational growth.

When the town imposed more stringent discharge permit limits, the manufacturer was presented a new opportunity to be resourceful. The LSM hired Woodard & Curran to evaluate, design, and build a new wastewater pretreatment system. The team developed an innovative solution that combined anaerobic digestion of high strength wastes with an aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR) to produce a water that met or exceeded the National Primary Drinking Water Standards water quality requirements. The $14 million investment in this new system spurred the LSM’s curiosity to capitalize on the treated resource by reusing the high-quality effluent. However, the LSM industrial discharge permit structure hindered additional reuse options.

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Splash Shot

Flooding does not deter intrepid Midwest operators

This spring massive flooding from rapid snowmelt and intense rainfall inundated the Midwest. Several water resource recovery facilities (WRRFs) were hit hard, but the dedication of the operators restored them to service as quickly as possible.

In Omaha, Neb., the Missouri River WRRF was overwhelmed by its namesake river. The federal levee along the river only protected the secondary treatment facility. A berm around the primary clarifiers and digester complex was overtopped and water poured into the site.  Operations staff was successful in maintaining treatment processes while an emergency berm was constructed directly in the floodwaters around the facility.

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Research Notes

Study: Oklahoma Wastewater Disposal Regulations Not Strict Enough To Prevent Earthquakes

Since 2012, Oklahoma has seen a sharp uptick in number of earthquakes. Several geologists have attributed this phenomenon to the large volume of wastewater that oil and gas drilling operations commonly pump back underground for disposal. In response, state regulators, in 2016, mandated a 40% reduction in wastewater volumes injected by oil and gas producers into northwestern Oklahoma’s Arbuckle formation.  

According to a recent study by University of Auckland (New Zealand) researchers, these reductions do not go far enough to prevent severe earthquakes.

Compared to pre-2016 levels, wastewater injection rates have dropped by as much as 65% as a result of the mandate, according to the study. But according to the researchers’ statistical models, even maintaining current injection rates would cause earthquakes to rise in frequency by 2025. These models predict how the Arbuckle formation would respond to stresses caused by different degrees of wastewater injection.

If injection rates increased slightly to match the current limits, the researchers predict that as many as 15 earthquakes of magnitude 3 or higher could occur in northwestern Oklahoma each month. Conversely, the models suggest that reducing injection rates to half of their current volume could eliminate wastewater-induced seismicity altogether by 2021.

Maintaining present injection rates also increases the likelihood of an extreme earthquake occurring, the researchers found; the model reports a 14% to 46% chance of an earthquake of magnitude 5 or greater before 2021. At the maximum injection rates condoned by regulators, that chance rises as high as 90%.

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Also in this section:

  • Hot Carbon Dioxide Bubbles Purify Water More Efficiently Than Boiling
  • Magnetic Nanoparticles Remove Difficult-to-Address Microconstituents
  • Solar Device Produces Hydrogen While Treating Wastewater

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Waterline

Report: U.S. Coral Reefs Protect $1.8 Billion in Coastal Infrastructure

The benefits of natural barriers against flooding, such as coastal forests, floodplains, and rain gardens, are often not assessed by infrastructure planners in the same black-and-white financial terms as are built solutions, such as dams and sea walls. As a result, adoption of innovative green infrastructure measures tends to trail behind traditional gray infrastructure.

A new report released by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) bridges this gap by exploring the value of U.S. coral reefs in purely economic terms. In all, report authors find that the approximately 3,100 km (1,920 mi) of coral reef-lined shoreline in the U.S. and its territories protect more than 18,000 people and $1.8 billion in coastal infrastructure from flooding each year.

“Our goal in this study was to provide sound science to identify where, when, and how U.S. coral reefs provide the most significant coastal flood reduction benefits to ultimately save dollars and protect lives,” said first author Curt Storlazzi, a USGS research geologist, in a release.

Drawing on data from the U.S. Census Bureau, the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency, and the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, researchers developed computer models that weave together meteorological and demographic data to show how specific coral reefs respond to local conditions that spur coastal flooding. Their analysis also considered how such factors as land elevation, population density, and the placement of such critical infrastructure as hospitals, roads, and power facilities affect threats to specific communities. In addition to average flood events, the models also simulated how coral reefs would respond to 50- and 100-year floods.

According to the USGS report, existing coral reefs provide

  • direct protection against flood damages to nearly 6,000 buildings, representing more than $825 million in value;
  • indirect protection against more than $699 million in individual economic activity and more than $272 million in business interruptions; and
  • defense against 33 critical infrastructure facilities.

Read the full report, Rigorously Valuing the Role of U.S. Coral Reefs in Coastal Hazard Risk Reduction, at bit.ly/coral-report.

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Also in this section

  • NASA Awards Florida Utilities $1.7 Million To Improve Water Supply Security

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Operator Essentials

What Every Operator Should Know About Reverse Osmosis Systems
Fred Edgecomb

Reverse osmosis (RO) is used in most potable and indirect potable reuse systems. Reverse osmosis also can make brackish water suitable for potable use.

This article familiarizes operators with RO equipment and processes, which are very different from conventional processes, but not substantially more complex.

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Problem Solvers

Sunny Seabrook finds the right gear for mixing

Problem: The direct-drive mixer for a solids digester caused odors and required extra maintenance.

Solution: Installing a gear-driven mixer enabled lower mixing speeds, which means less odors, as well as switching to a smaller motor.

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In a picturesque part of Seabrook, Texas, you’d never know you’re at a water resource recovery facility until a small submersible mixer starts to spin up. The view of yachts, wild birds, and palm trees cooled by a welcome breeze across Trinity and Galveston bays is very pleasantly distracting. Located just 30 minutes south of Houston, this inviting small town can rightly boast one of the world’s most pleasant WRRFs. The facility also exemplifies the benefits of planning ahead with simple, clever design.

When much of the low-lying grounds in southeast Texas were devastated by the Category 4 Hurricane Harvey, the Seabrook Wastewater Treatment Plant kept operating. In anticipation that flood waters would one day infiltrate the facility, all electrical controls were mounted well above the high-water mark.

The submersible mixer mentioned above plays a vital role in Seabrook being a good neighbor, especially with so many waterfront properties close by in the vibrant yet relaxed area that feels more like a resort-style experience.

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Business

The Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRD) Board of Commissioners selected Brian A. Perkovich to serve as its executive director. Perkovich has 25 years of experience working in the company’s maintenance and operations department. 

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Dewberry (Fairfax, Va.) hired Sean O’Connell as department manager of the water/wastewater facilities group in its Denver office. O’Connell has more than 25 years of extensive experience in wastewater treatment facility design and construction, including experience with screenings/grit removal; primary/secondary clarifiers; activated sludge aeration systems; disinfection facilities; and biosolids treatment, thickening, dewatering, and conveyance; and pump station and pipelines.

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Spectro Scientific (Chelmsford, Mass.), suppliers of fluid analysis instrumentation and software, has been purchased by AMETEK Inc. (Berwyn, Pa.). Spectro has annual sales of approximately $50 million and was acquired for approximately $190 million. 

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Danfoss (Nordborg, Germany) acquired AAIM Controls Inc. (Waynesboro, Pa.). AAIM is a specialized supplier of custom-designed regulation and control automation solutions ranging from motor starters to complete programmable logic controller systems.

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Also in this section

  • McMillen Jacobs Associates (Boise, Idaho)
  • Nanostone Water (Waltham, Mass.)
  • Tarlton Corp. (St. Louis)

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Projects

Yorkshire Water (Bradford, Yorkshire, England) is nearing completion of its £72 million new solids treatment facility in Leeds. The project began in April 2016. Commissioning work started on the site, designed and built by Black & Veatch (Overland Park, Kan.), in October 2018. Now, the facility is almost ready to be handed over to Yorkshire Water.

The facility’s digesters are the largest to be constructed in the Yorkshire Water region and will have the capacity to treat 131 tonnes of dry solids produced at the Knostrop Works in Leeds as well as solids imported from other treatment works across the wider Yorkshire region.

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The Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD; Fountain Valley, Calif.) Newhope-Placentia Trunk Sewer Replacement Project was recognized by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE; Reston, Va.) as the Wastewater Treatment Project of the Year.

The project will replace almost 11 km (7 mi) of sewer along State College Blvd. in the cities of Fullerton and Anaheim to increase capacity of the district’s regional system. Once the project is complete, an additional 30 million L (8 million gal) of wastewater will be diverted to OCSD’s Plant No. 1 in Fountain Valley for treatment before being sent to the nearby Orange County Water District (OCWD) Groundwater Replenishment System.

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Charlotte (N.C.) Water awarded Russelectric (Hingham, Mass.), a manufacturer of power control systems and automatic transfer switches, a contract to supply the utility with paralleling switchgear for its water and wastewater treatment facilities. The paralleling switchgear will monitor the incoming utility power and, in the event of a utility power failure, ensure the transfer of critical emergency backup power.

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Also in this section

  • Patriot Environmental Services (Wilmington, Calif.)
  • Silicon Valley Clean Water (SVCW; Redwood City, Calif.)
  • Nexinite (Napa, Calif.)

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Water Volumes

Becoming Leaders: A Practical Handbook for Women in Engineering, Science, and Technology (2nd Edition)

F. Mary Williams, Ph.D. and Carolyn J. Emerson (2019), American Society of Civil Engineers, 1801 Alexander Bell Drive, Reston, VA 20191-4382, 226 pp., $35.00 (list), $26.25 (ASCE member), softcover, ISBN-9780784415238. 

This is a second edition of the popular handbook that provides practical leadership guidance for women whose interests are grounded in science, engineering, and technology.  Additionally, for students and young professionals, the tips provided in this publication represent a valuable set of recommendations for “manageable actions” and “organizational insights” regarding diversity and leadership awareness for women who choose science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) career paths. An emphasis is placed on vision, value, and courage as key leadership elements, while at the same time underscoring that there are many opportunities to provide and practice leadership skills at all organizational levels. The publication articulates practical advice in this quick read and cites numerous studies related to implicit bias and provides associated assessment resources.

Strategies for women in STEM are provided throughout the publication and arranged via career stages with attention on recommendations for students, faculty members, academic deans, and department heads, as the content is predicated in academia likely due to the backgrounds of the authors. Some learned behaviors, such as risk taking, are not typically part of course curriculum, but are an important component in leadership progression. The “Strategies for Students in STEM,” “Graduate Studies,” and “Job Hunting and Gender” sections impart interesting information with the bonus of a bit of humor woven into the examples, such as “Learn to be comfortable failing (not your classes, though!).”  

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Products

Stormwater Treatment System
StormwateRx LLC (Portland, Ore.); www.stormwaterx.com

The Purus Nitrate targets soluble nitrate in industrial stormwater runoff. This system is ideal for industries where nitrogen compounds or petroleum products are used or where organic materials are processed, including fabricated metal products, food processing, and chemical manufacturing. The system is normally installed and flow-matched in a treatment-train configuration with the company’s Aquip stormwater filtration technology, an upstream pre-filtration system.

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Operations Software
Schneider Electric (Knightdale, N.C.); www.schneider-electric.us

The EcoStruxure™ augmented operator advisor software brings together physical, real-life objects with virtual objects to increase operational efficiency, reduce costs, and improve proactive maintenance. The system’s interface gives operators access to information in the field for operations and maintenance. It allows for fast diagnosis without lockout or electrical qualification and provides opportunity for safe and rapid detection of abnormalities and access to key performance indicators. The plug-and-play architecture works on tablets such as iOS® and has Android and Windows® versions in progress. It uses a Windows-based PC as the server platform. The system can be used in mining, minerals and metals, water and wastewater, food and beverage, and infrastructure. It also can be adapted for any industrial domain.

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Pumps
Watson-Marlow Fluid Technology Group (Wilmington, Mass.); www.wmftg.com

The Qdos pump has mobile and remote applications and can be powered by a 12-24V DC power supply that can boost productivity and cut chemical waste via more accurate, linear, and repeatable metering than conventional solenoid or stepper-driven diaphragm metering pumps. Users can reduce chemical costs even when metering difficult fluids, or when pressure, viscosity, and solids content vary. This capability combines with peristaltic technology to ensure precise, continuous, smooth flow for optimal fluid mixing. 

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Router
Digi International® (Hopkins, Minn.); www.digi.com

The Digi IX14 router provides reliable, efficient, low-cost IoT connectivity for devices located in rugged, demanding environments. The system contains an LTE modem capable of 3G fallback for North America, and a soon-to-be-released version will support 3G/2G fallback for Europe. The system has been physically hardened to withstand extreme environmental conditions with MIL-STD-810G certification for shock, vibration, and temperature, and an IP54 rating for dust and water resistance.

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Gas Detection
Industrial Scientific (Pittsburgh, Pa.); www.indsci.com

The RGX Gateway enables designated safety contacts to receive real-time alerts for gas hazards, panic, and man-down situations happening in plant or in the field. A live map shows the location of workers and current conditions, therefore improving response times and arming emergency personnel with critical information. The system is compatible with Ventis® Pro Series Multi-Gas monitors and Radius® BZ1 Area monitors. Through the LENS™ wireless instrument-to-instrument mesh communication system, the monitors share gas readings and alarms with one another and the RGX gateway. The gateway then transmits readings through cell, Wi-Fi, or Ethernet to iNet® Now Live monitoring software, which alerts key team members within seconds of an incident.

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Gas Monitors
MSA Safety (Cranberry, Pa.); www.MSAsafety.com

The X5000 and S5000 gas monitors tracktoxic and combustible gas in a wide range of hazardous industries. These detectors feature Bluetooth® wireless technology and now can connect with the company’s X/S Connect App, which is available for both iOS Android® devices. Users can wirelessly access the gas monitors from as far away as 23 m (75 ft) using a Bluetooth-enabled smartphone or tablet.

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Ozone generation system
Aqua-Aerobic Systems Inc. (Loves Park, Ill.); www.aqua-aerobic.com

The Aqua ElectrOzone® M-Series ozone system is designed for smaller installations seeking the advantages of system modularity and built-in redundancy. Each ozone system is configurable in 15 lb/d increments up to 540 lb/d. The technology eliminates the challenges that lead to dielectric failures found in other ozone generators and includes a limited 10-year dielectric warranty in most municipal applications. Additional features include simple installation and operation, modular ozone cells, integrated process control, and silent operation.

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Power Supply
Emerson (Rosemont, Ill.); www.emerson.com

The SolaHD SDN 16-12-100C power supply is designed for use in harsh environments and hazardous locations worldwide. The 12-Vdc power supply has all the same features as the legacy SDN 16-12-100P it replaces and is 27% narrower to take up significantly less space on a DIN rail. The power supply addresses the needs of factory automation, petrochemical processing, chemical facilities, wastewater treatment, material handling, and more. The system meets extensive international certifications including UL, CSA, CE, Class I Zone 2, ATEX, IECEx, ExEAC, ABS, and DNV-GL to ensure global compliance, even in hazardous locations and off-shore applications. For critical applications, two units of SDN 16-12-100C can be used in conjunction with the SDN 2X20RED redundancy module to provide redundant power supply operation.

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Protective Coating
Sherwin-Williams (Cleveland, Ohio); www.sherwin-williams.com

The Sher-Loxane 800 is a versatile, high-performance, polysiloxane coating. It offers enhanced durability and aesthetics as well as cost savings by eliminating one step of the overall coating system. The smooth, finished product delivers long-term asset protection in the most aggressive service conditions. It also resists attack from mold, mildew, and algae in immersion service. The cured coating’s low surface energy prevents organic growth from taking hold, maintaining aesthetics and a high-gloss finish for steel and concrete applications including water tanks and chlorine contact chambers.

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Vertical Motors
Nidec Motor Corp. (St. Louis); www.nidec.com

The TITAN® II WPI and WPII 449 frame vertical motors are available in both HOLLOSHAFT® and solid shaft constructions. The TITAN II 449 frame offers a redesigned upper bracket for better environmental protection. The 449 lower brackets also have been redesigned to allow stiffer attachment of the motor to the pump head. This overall stiffer construction has raised its reed critical frequency (RCF) on average 12%, with multiple p-base options (20 in., 24.5 in. and 30.5 in.) to allow altering the RCF for the best variable speed pumping system design to stay out of the resonance region. The redesign of the upper and lower brackets also allows a change to the airflow to better cool and increase motor efficiency.

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Diagnostic Inspection Tool
CUES Inc. (Orlando, Fla.); www.cuesinc.com

The REDI Kit features a high-resolution web camera for two-way video conferencing to expedite troubleshooting and enhance parts identification, a diagnostic test box for easy access to the TV cable conductors via test points, a built in mini-camera, which is used to send video back thru the TV cable and truck, and much more. 

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Sensors
NewTek Sensor Solutions (Pennsauken, N.J.); www.newteksensors.com

The RV series of rotary variable differential transformers (RVDT) rotary position sensors offer highly accurate angular displacement measurement of rotating elements such as quarter-turn ball and butterfly valves, actuators, throttles, and dancer arm tensioners used in industrial machine-to-machine applications. With a shaft that rotates a full 360 degrees with no stops and virtually no friction, these AC-operated rotary position sensors measure shaft angle position over a nominal range of ±30 degrees. RVDTs are known for reliability and ruggedness in extreme environments, with a non-contacting design, which gives the sensor extremely long operational life by eliminating components that wear or degrade over time. The units operate over a temperature range of –65°F to 220°F and exhibit a linearity error of less than 0.5% of full range. 

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Mobile Device
AMREL (Los Angeles); www.amrel.com

The versatile AT80 can be used as a mobile tablet, an onboard vehicle terminal, a wall- or equipment-mounted smart control, or as an integrated solution. The system is ideal for manufacturing facilities, industrial settings, field operations, or any enterprise operating in a harsh environment. The system’s unique channel design enables quick integration of other modules or devices without full development costs. Based on an aeronautical design, its single billet, one-piece aluminum chassis can withstand extreme environmental conditions including heat, cold, humidity, water, dust, vibration, and drop.

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Metering Pump
Wanner Engineering (Minneapolis); www.wannereng.com

The Hydra-Cell Metering Solutions SM series electronic solenoid metering pumps are designed for reliable and economical chemical injection. The pumps are designed for applications in municipal and industrial water purification, wastewater treatment, metering of chemicals for disinfection and pH neutralization for swimming pool treatment, and de-chlorination treatment for reverse osmosis film. The system features a simple hand-operated dial with stroke adjustment from 15 to 300 strokes per minute. Maximum discharge volumes range from 28 to 100 mL/min and maximum discharge pressure ratings range from 58 to 217 lb/in.2 (4 to 15 bar) depending on the model.

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