This month's topics: Stormwater • Microplastics • Industrial treatment • Entrepreneurship

April 2019 • Volume 31 • Number 4

This month's featured content

Biosolids system improvements pay for themselves
Implemented through a design–build performance contract, this project will deliver sustainable benefits and recover costs through energy savings in Medina County, Ohio
Blake Childress, Kevin Sullivan, Mike Hanna, James Greenyer, Phil Cummings, Amy S. Lyon-Galvin, J. Trent Crayden, and Dawn Taylor

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A green and gray CBP3
Community-based public-private partnership aims to improve stormwater controls, stimulate economy
Keisha Brown

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Selling it in the water sector
Identifying and executing entrepreneurial opportunities
Members of 2018 WEF Water Leadership Institute

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The greenways are coming
A lesson in asset overlap
William Rice

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Features

Biosolids system improvements pay for themselves
Implemented through a design–build performance contract, this project will deliver sustainable benefits and recover costs through energy savings in Medina County, Ohio
Blake Childress, Kevin Sullivan, Mike Hanna, James Greenyer, Phil Cummings, Amy S. Lyon-Galvin, J. Trent Crayden, and Dawn Taylor

A new, $35 million biosolids system at the Kenneth W. Hotz Water Reclamation Facility (WRF) in Medina County, Ohio, provides energy-performance savings, increased effectiveness, and other sustainable benefits through an innovative design–build performance contract. The innovative delivery approach will increase treatment efficiency and improve performance without customer-rate increases.

The delivery approach isn’t the only innovative project feature. The project incorporates advanced technologies that are new or emerging in the U.S. Pulling from the most appropriate options in the world, the design–builder helped the county harness technologies that will reduce the WRF’s annual operating costs by approximately 50%.

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A green and gray CBP3
Community-based public-private partnership aims to improve stormwater controls, stimulate economy
Keisha Brown

This collaborative initiative — in the form of a community-based public-private partnership (CBP3) — focuses on green and gray infrastructure and sustainability while improving the local economy, stormwater management, and water quality. Today, this partnership is moving ahead to realize these goals.

The Stormwater Authority of Chester (Pa.) and Corvias (East Greenwich, R.I.) have formed a CBP3 to plan, implement, and manage an integrated water quality program within the City of Chester. The creators have made an initial $50 million commitment toward water quality infrastructure development, including a long-term, 30-year operation and maintenance program. 

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Selling it in the water sector
Identifying and executing entrepreneurial opportunities
Members of the 2018 WEF Water Leadership Institute

Every day millions of water quality professionals think about ways to manage the world’s water in the face of increasingly stringent regulations, climate change effects, and overstressed aging infrastructure. Sometimes, it’s not enough to do things the way they’ve always been done. Sometimes, solving problems means taking a risk.

While entrepreneurship may seem like a high-risk activity, everyone uses skills every day that are innovative and enterprising. From identifying an opportunity, to getting a team on board, to pushing the solution out to market, we each possess and practice the skills needed to make a new solution successful.

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The greenways are coming
A lesson in asset overlap
William Rice

If you run a large water or wastewater utility in an increasingly urbanizing area, it is inevitable that greenways are going to overlap with your system. While there are some potential downsides — security risks, property liability, and potential hazards for underground assets and collection systems — the benefits can outweigh the risks. Greenways can enhance public connection with your utility, help grow government partnerships across different units, and can provide added value to your region.

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News

Mulching with microplastics
Microplastics in the human food chain underscore biosolids producers’ need for best practices
Justin Jacques

Last year, researchers in Austria found at least one type of microplastics — defined as tiny bits of plastic, each less than 5 mm (0.2 in.) across — in stool samples from people around the world. The team’s findings, along with plastic found in wildlife and their habitats, confirm what many in the research community have suspected for years: microplastics have spread into virtually every part of our environment. This includes waterways, soil, air, and the food chain.

As more plastics enter sewers, many water resource recovery facilities (WRRFs) continue to process wastewater solids into biosolids for reuse as fertilizers and other soil amendments. To deliver biosolids-based products that truly remove microplastics from the environment, WRRFs are investigating how to enhance management solutions.

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University grows produce one drip at a time
Georgia Tech researchers experiments with an innovative hydroponic growing system using treated campus wastewater
LaShell Stratton-Childers

Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech; Atlanta) received a 5-year, $5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture for a pilot program to grow vegetables and fruits on campus. But it is how they will grow these plants, rather than the size of the grant, that’s noteworthy. The researchers will use a hydroponic growing system fed by treated wastewater to fertilize the fruits and vegetables.

The researchers will use an anaerobic membrane bioreactor (AnMBR) for treatment that will transfer organic contaminants into biogas and remove such pathogens as Escherichia coli to ensure food safety. The treatment will leave nutrients — nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium — in the wastewater, according to the release.

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Florida moves to protect waters
Executive order enhances conservation, accountability
LaShell Stratton-Childers

The State of Florida leapt forward in efforts to restore its waterways. In January, Governor Ron DeSantis signed “Achieving More Now for Florida’s Environment,” an executive order with a focus on both conservation of watersheds and more accountability within state government. The executive order is intended to help improve the environment and water quality in Florida.

The executive order includes several measures. One is $2.5 billion in funding over the next 4 years for Everglades restoration and protection of water resources. This is a $1 billion increase in spending over the previous 4 years, making it the highest level of funding for restoration in Florida’s history, according to the news release. Additionally, the executive order instructs the South Florida Water Management District to immediately start the next phase of the Everglades Agricultural Area Storage Reservoir Project design and ensure that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers approves the project according to schedule.

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From the Editors

If you’ve got it, flaunt it

When Ron Alexander became one of the first full-time biosolids compost salespeople in 1984, the idea of recycling biosolids as soil amendments instead of discharging them directly into waterways was a tough sell. But just 35 years later, water professionals now recover more than half of all biosolids produced in the U.S. for beneficial reuse.

The biosolids story is a testament to the water sector’s endless drive to innovate on behalf of public health and the environment. However, as Alexander writes in “The greatest recycling story never told” on p. 11, coming up with a disruptive idea is only the first step on the long road toward implementation. Faced with higher-than-ever environmental stakes, water professionals must do more to communicate their groundbreaking research, inventions, and approaches.

Today’s most successful water professionals not only have the technical knowhow to tackle the world’s toughest environmental issues, but also the entrepreneurial skills to make new ideas come to life. Penned by graduates of the Water Environment Federation 2018 Water Leadership Institute, “Selling it in the water sector” on p. 36 offers insight into how water professionals can use concepts from the startup world to translate theory into practice.

This issue also showcases facilities and organizations successfully navigating the quickly blurring lines between innovation and entrepreneurship. In Medina County, Ohio, a project to enhance biosolids management — financed with a new spin on the design–build contract model —promises to reduce total facility operating costs by up to 50% (p. 26); and a pilot project created by the City of Altamonte Springs, Fla., aims to continue the municipality’s tradition of leadership on potable reuse (p. 50).

 

—   The editors

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Correction

In the February 2019 From the Trenches column, two photos were wrongly credited to GHD Consulting Services Inc. The photo credit for the tunnel photo belongs to Jim Cowe. The photo credit for the thermal scan belongs to Penetradar Corp. (Niagara Falls, N.Y.). We apologize for the error.

Facility Focus

The Altamonte Springs Regional Water Reclamation Facility provides wastewater treatment for several municipalities. The facility is one of the few in the country that provides reclaimed water to nearly all customers for irrigation. The facility strives to implementing forward-thinking projects and proactive initiatives.

“We are constantly striving to think outside the box and deliver smart, fiscally responsible solutions to the challenges of tomorrow,” said Frank Martz, Altamonte Springs city manager. “We want to deliver services for our residents that aren’t just excellent for a small city — they’re world-class.”

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Design Data

Altamonte Springs (Fla.) Regional Water Reclamation Facility
Location: Altamonte Springs, Fla.
Startup date: 1989
Service population: 120,000
Number of employees: 38
Flow: 47.3 ML/d (12.5 mgd)

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From the Trenches

The problem with “probably” and TTWWADI
Richard R. Roll and Michael S. Eagler Sr.

Nobody wants to look foolish or ignorant at his or her job. While many people will confess not knowing an answer, others are just unable to do so. Instead, they will find ways to cover or deflect the issue of them not knowing something they think they should. A prime example of this is the use of the word “probably” when answering a question.

When someone answers your questions with “probably,” a little alarm horn should go off in the back your mind. You should ask yourself, does “probably” or its equivalent, “I think so,” translate to any of the following?

  • “This is something I heard 15 or 20 years ago.”
  • “This is fourth-hand information from an unknown source.”
  • “This is an educated guess, hedged with a little uncertainty.”
  • “This is an uneducated guess, but I had to give some kind of an answer.”
  • “This is an uneducated guess, because I’m having a little fun with you.”

An answer to a question should be that — an answer. Adding a qualifier makes it something less than an answer and prompts some further discussion or another means of verification. As the statistician W. Edwards Deming once said, “In God we trust; all others bring data.”

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For a well-rounded, versatile engineer, technical and regulatory expertise must always remain a core competency. However, understanding and appreciating elements of human nature, team building, safe workplace practices, undocumented tribal knowledge, and unconventional diagnostic methods are just as important. These elements can’t be learned from books or most undergraduate courses. They will come from a blend of first-hand experience and memorable advice collected along the way.

In this series, some seasoned (and battle-scarred) professionals will try to ease the learning curve in collection system operations and maintenance for younger professionals by offering advice and insight based on real-life experiences.

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Viewpoint

The greatest recycling story never told
Ron Alexander

Today, more than 50% of the biosolids generated are beneficially reused (millions of dry tons per year). But let’s face it, many of us spend most of our time defending the practice of biosolids reuse or trying to keep our program under wraps. We are not out in the public eye promoting the incredible service and products that we provide.

Biosolids is not a dirty word. With decades of success under our belt, it is pretty obvious that the repurposing and beneficial reuse of biosolids is probably the greatest recycling story in the U.S. But no one really talks about it and many don’t even know the story.

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Research Notes

Researchers identify species with potential to revolutionize algal wastewater treatment

When used during tertiary treatment at water resource recovery facilities (WRRFs), algae can remove and repurpose nutrients from wastewater, creating biofuels and other useful byproducts in the process. However, the biological conditions most algae species require in order to function combined with the unpredictability of wastewater nutrient contents have hindered their implementation at WRRFs.

Researchers from the University of Arkansas (UA; Fayetteville) report a breakthrough with Chlorella vulgaris, a single-celled, freshwater microalgae species sometimes used in dietary supplements. Whereas most algae species require the presence of both nitrogen and phosphorus to trigger their nutrient removal functions, Chlorella vulgaris consumes nutrients even after one of those pollutants has been depleted. This means Chlorella vulgaris can treat a wider range of effluents, explained Wen Zhang, a UA environmental engineering professor and co-author of the study.

“One of the factors that significantly impacts algal wastewater treatment is nutrient availability,” Zhang said in a Jan. 14 press release. “What is the ideal range of nitrogen-to-phosphorus mass ratio for algal growth? Because previous research failed to identify this, the efficacy of algal treatment has been difficult to predict or optimize.”

Researchers tested Chlorella vulgaris in synthetic wastewater with varying nitrate and phosphate concentrations, as well as in real effluent sampled from two WRRFs. The algae effectively removed the nitrogen and phosphorus that remained in each wastewater sample at all concentrations and ratios tested after the wastewater had undergone secondary treatment, according to the study.

The experiments also uncovered valuable information for biofuel production. In real wastewater, when deprived of nitrogen, the algae began to accumulate large amounts of neutral lipids – the building blocks for biofuels. The mechanism did not trigger when the algae was deprived of phosphorus.

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Also in this section:

  • Sea anemone-inspired nanomaterial treats several pollutants in a single step
  • Microbial fuel cell treats coffee wastewater while generating electricity

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Waterline

Tiny robots to rehabilitate U.K. collections systems without roadwork

Four British universities will use £7 million awarded by the government of the United Kingdom to address the country’s aging underground collections systems while minimizing worker risks and traffic disruptions. The institutions — University of Birmingham, University of Bristol, University of Leeds, and Sheffield University – will develop and commercialize 1-cm (0.4-in) -long robotic devices that fix pipe leaks and blockages in hard-to-reach places, according to a government news release.

U.K. water workers perform about 1.5 million road excavations per year to service underground collections systems, causing an estimated £5 billion in annual disruptions to local businesses, the government’s Dec. release described If successful, the “micro robot” project could significantly reduce the need for roadwork once made available within the next 5 years.

“While for now we can only dream of a world without roadworks disrupting our lives, these pipe-repairing robots herald the start of technology that could make that dream a reality in the future,” said Chris Skidmore, U.K. Science Minister, in the release.

 Kirill Horoshenkov, who leads the robot development initiative from the University of Sheffield, told The Daily Telegraph in December that the team expects their robots to use sonar rather than cameras to sense their surroundings. By tapping on pipes and navigating via vibrations, the robots will be able to locate defects even in pitch-dark tunnels.

The project is part of the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund, administered by U.K. Research and Innovation, which intends to invest a total of £4.7 billion in innovative infrastructure management solutions during 4 years. A spate of 14 related projects made possible via the fund will use the micro robots in other settings that pose a danger to human workers, such as offshore wind farms, in nuclear decommissioning facilities, and on satellites in orbit.

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Also in this section:

  • New dyeing technique drastically reduces water cost of blue jeans production
  • Nasdaq and partners release first pricing index for California water transactions
  • Boston Harbor cleanup provided as much as 20 times its cost in ecological benefits, study argues

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Problem Solvers

Onsite leachate treatment system delivers big savings to Monroe County, Ind.

Problem: Meeting regulations for leachate becomes a costly endeavor for an Indiana landfill.

Solution: Simple onsite leachate treatment system delivers savings for the long-term.

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As stormwater drains through collected materials on land such as waste at a landfill, it becomes leachate, which can accumulate many kinds of toxic compounds.

During the 1980s and 1990s, increasingly rigorous regulations were put on U.S. landfills to protect groundwater from leachate contamination. Landfills had to design, engineer, and build drainage and collection systems to capture leachate, and they had to determine how to treat it. Most chose to transport leachate using trucks or pipelines to the nearest publicly owned water resource recovery facility (WRRF), but Monroe County, Ind. — home to 140,000 residents — decided on a more cost-effective, onsite approach.

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Business

Jad Daley has been named president and CEO of American Forests (Washington, D.C.). Daley has 20 years of experience leading diverse forest sector coalitions and partnerships. This includes 10 years leading the Forest-Climate Working Group, which he co-founded in 2007, and serving as the founding director for the Eastern Forest Partnership.

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Val-Matic (Elmhust, Ill.) named Tim O’Shea engineering project manager. He has more than 18 years of valve design and application experience.

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The Silicon Valley Clean Water Commission (Redwood City, Calif.) selected Teresa Herrera as manager. Herrera becomes the third manager in the commission’s nearly 50-year history, and the first woman to fill the post. She joined the commission in March 2008 as plant engineer to create its first engineering department and implement its $339-million capital improvement program.

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Dewberry (Fairfax, Va.) promoted Elese (Lisa) Adele Roger to chief information officer. Roger has 28 years of experience, and previously served as executive director of information and technology. She will report to the firm’s CEO and the board of directors.

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Also in this section:

  • Freese and Nichols Inc. (San Antonio, Texas)
  • RJN Group Inc. (Wheaton, Ill.)
  • Cardno, Inc. (Baton Rouge, La.)
  • IFS (Itasca, Ill.)
  • Mott MacDonald (Iselin, N.J)
  • Innovation360 (Stockholm and New York)
  • Gresham Smith (Nashville, Tenn.)
  • Tesco Controls Inc. (TESCO; Sacramento, Calif.)
  • Buchart Horn Architects (York, Pa.)
  • Bonita Springs Utilities Inc. (Bonita Springs, Fla.)
  • Gannett Fleming (Harrisburg, Pa.)

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Water Volumes

Wastewater Treatment and Reuse: Theory and Design Examples
1st Edition (2018). Syed R. Qasim and Guang Zhu. CRC Press, Taylor and Francis Group, 6000 Broken Sound Parkway, NW, Suite 300, Boca Raton, FL 33487-2742, 1928 pp, $279.95, Hardcover, ISBN 978-1-138-30094-1.

Wastewater Treatment and Reuse is a two-volume book. This is one of the most detailed design books on the full spectrum of wastewater topics. The authors have meticulously provided solved examples on each topic and design equation. More than 700 illustrative examples covering subject matter from headworks to effluent discharge, from reuse to energy recovery, are shown with step-by-stepcalculations.

The authors followed a consistent format for each topic in both volumes, which included the theory involved, the design parameters, and an illustration of concept by providing design examples.

The first volume contains ten chapters covering the conventional treatment operations and processes. It starts by laying solid introductory chapters on stoichiometry and reaction kinetics, mass and flow equalization along with wastewater characteristics. The preliminary treatment operations are covered in detail with dozens of design examples. The book also provides very comprehensive and in-depth chapters on primary and secondary treatment processes. More than 200 solved examples are given on all design aspects of physio-chemical and biological processes. It includes mainstream processes to specialized treatment schemes.

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Projects

The City of Palo Alto, Calif., selected Brown and Caldwell (Walnut Creek, Calif.) to provide design services for secondary treatment upgrades at the city’s Regional Water Quality Control Plant (RWQCP).

Operational since 1934, the RWQCP has a 148,000-m3/d (39-mgd) design capacity. It treats wastewater before it is recycled or discharged to the San Francisco Bay and serves the cities of Palo Alto, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, and Mountain View, Calif.; Stanford (Calif.) University; and the East Palo Alto (Calif.) Sanitary District. Upgrades are viewed as a key driver in the City of Palo Alto of achieving long-term utility performance and value. The city is facing system capacity constraints driven by population growth, heightened effluent quality regulations, and aging infrastructure. Having undergone several expansions and improvements, primarily occurring in the 1970s and 1980s, many assets now need rehabilitation and replacement.

Brown and Caldwell will provide engineering services during all phases of the $31 million project, including preliminary design, design, bid-period services, engineering services during construction, and support during commissioning and start-up.

The 4-year project will be designed along energy-saving design principles. The goal will be to reduce energy use throughout the RWQCP. Innovations will include improved aeration and pumping systems as well as reconfiguration of the treatment process to provide higher quality, energy-efficient wastewater treatment.

Following an 18-month design phase, construction activities are expected to begin in 2020 with the upgraded facility being fully operational by spring 2022. 

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Also in this issue:

  • Roxborough Water and Sanitation District
  • Veolia Water Technologies Inc.
  • Anaergia Inc. 
  • Padre Dam Municipal Water District 
  • Contra Costa Water District 

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Products

Wastewater treatment solutions
Fluence Corp. Ltd. (White Plains, N.Y.); www.fluencecorp.com

The Aspiral™ family of decentralized, smart-packaged wastewater is a modular solution that reduces aeration energy consumption by as much as 90% as compared to conventional wastewater treatment methods, making it ideal for small- to medium-sized installations serving small towns, villages, residential communities, resorts, hotels, and commercial complexes. The system offers several sized models, with treatment capacities per unit ranging from 20 to 350 m3/d (5200 to 92,000 gal/d), depending on effluent requirements and design temperature. The Aspiral™ L3, which treats up to 300 m³/d (80,000 gal/d) of raw municipal wastewater, is equipped with all internal air and wastewater piping and arrives ready for fast installation and start-up. The Aspiral™ S1 and M2 models treat up to 50 m³/d (14,000 gal/d) and 115 m³/d (30,000 gal/d) of raw municipal wastewater, respectively and include internal clarifiers and integral pre-treatment screen.

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Pumps 
Wanner Engineering Inc. (Minneapolis); www.wannereng.com

The Hydra-Cell T100 series high pressure pumps feature corrosion-resistant 316L stainless steel pump heads and an expanded choice of diaphragm materials, valve materials, and actuating oils. With flow rates as much as 26 gal/min. (98 L/min; 891 b/d) and discharge pressures to 5000 lb/in2 (345 bar), the system is designed for a variety of applications including salt water disposal, salt water injection, bulk transfer, and hydraulic lift in oil fields, as well as steam generation, reverse osmosis in water and wastewater treatment, and mine dewatering. Featuring a seal-less, multiple-diaphragm design, the pumps eliminate hazardous volatile organic compounds emissions along with clean-up and disposal costs of packed-pump leakage. The design also eliminates the need for external lubrication and maintenance as well as plunger wear problems associated with packing.

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Flame detector
MSA Safety Inc.(Cranberry Township, Pa.); www.MSAsafety.com

The next-generation FL500 optical flame detector offers a wide field of view as much as 130° for optimum protection. The system features three external LED indicators for local verification by technicians of normal operation, fault conditions, and alarms. On-board relays provide flexible detector status communications, with automated plant safety and control systems via HART, Modbus, 4-20 mA sink, or source communications. Designed with continuous optical-path monitoring, the detector conducts its own self-check every 2 minutes. The detector also can be tested with the explosion proof TL105 test lamp, which simulates the flickering of a fire and provides a high-energy, broadband radiation source that emits energy in both the ultraviolet and infrared spectra to safely activate the flame sensors.

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Portable drum handler
Liftomatic Material Handling Inc. (Buffalo Grove, Ill.); www.liftomatic.com

The C1D1-DCM power drum transporter is completely powered and self-contained handling device for lifting, lowering, and moving all types of steel, plastic, and fiber drums.

The unit incorporates a completely electrically enclosed and spark-free power drive, as well as power lift and lower for moving drums quickly and efficiently. The models offer users several benefits including protection for “EE” and “EX” rated environments. Features include a steering/throttle handle for forward/reverse drive, lift and lower, and tight turning radius for tight aisle and restricted workspace facilities. The transporter offers a standard lift height of 20 in. to allow for palletizing on standard or spill pallets and handles up to 1000# per drum. The power system can negotiate inclines and offers the ability to load/unload trucks and shipping containers. 

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Datalogger
Solinst Canada Ltd. (Georgetown, Ontario, Canada); www.solinst.com

The LevelVent is a vented version of Solinst Levelogger. The system uses a vented pressure transducer for reliable, accurate (0.05% full scale) datalogging of water levels that are automatically and barometrically compensated. The system combines pressure and temperature sensors, a 10-year battery, and a datalogger for up to 120,000 data sets within a 7/8 in.-x-7 in. (22 mm-x-178 mm) stainless steel housing. The system also features a robust, low maintenance design. Hydrophobic filters and permanent desiccants provide moisture protection for the lifetime of the instrument. Durable, custom designed vented cables are available to 500 ft.

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Wastewater washer compactor
Duperon Corp. (Saginaw, Mich.); www.duperon.com

The Wastewater Washer Compactor transports compacted debris that is collected by a bar screen in a water resource recovery facility as much as 40 ft in any direction without the energy usage and layout challenges of a traditional motorized conveyance system. The technology eliminates maintenance requirements and provides an innovative method for managing compacted screenings without additional equipment.

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Smart camera
Tattile (Brescia, Italy); www.tattile.com

The S12MP smart camera is designed for applications requiring high-speed and compact size including the semiconductor industry and two- and three-dimensional analysis. The camera is a powerful combination of a 12 Megapixel CMOS global shutter image sensor, the Xilinx Zynq 7030 processor, and a Kintex7 FPGA, with 125K work together to achieve acquisition speeds up to 300 frames/sec. at full resolution that can be further increased by partializing the acquisition and reducing the image size. This synergy, along with the open platform Linux OS or the easy to program Nautilus software tool, makes the camera perfectly designed for online inspection, robotics, and three-dimensional measurement systems.

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Metering pump
Watson-Marlow Fluid Technology Group (Wilmington, Mass.); www.wmftg.com

 

The Qdos metering pump boosts productivity and cuts chemical wastage via more accurate, linear, and repeatable metering than conventional solenoid or stepper-driven diaphragm metering pumps. The pump is suitable for both remote static and mobile battery-powered applications. Typical uses of the 12-24V DC version include agricultural seed coating and crop irrigation, remote water treatment/sampling, potable water refining, and on-truck pumping operations. For very remote applications, the pump runs on batteries that can be recharged via solar cells, other renewable energy sources, or split-charge relays. The pump is self- contained and does not require additional components.

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Buffer module
Phoenix Contact (Middletown, Pa.); www.phoenixcontact.com

 

The Quint Cap and Quint Buffer modules provide several seconds of backup time, starting at less than 20 milliseconds after power loss to critical applications. These new modules are the ideal solution for applications that cannot lose power for the slightest power disturbance. The battery alternatives use capacitors, which give them a long service life and mean time between failure. This creates worry-free power, without the need for an uninterruptible power supply for sensitive devices that could reboot with a short interruption of power.

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Dewatering pump
BJM (Old Saybrook, Conn.); www.bjmpumps.com

The KB220 dewatering pump, pumps as much as 810 gal/min. This 30 hp addition to the company’s KB series is available in 460 or 575 volts and offers a maximum head to 186 ft. The pump features the same benefits as the KB series, including the ability to move settled solids with chrome iron agitator; no leaks because of its advanced double mechanical seal design, with separate lip seal, long reliable service, longer run times with top rated (NEMA) Class H motor insulation 356° (180°C), embedded thermal sensors in the motor windings to protect the motor from overheating, and durable, heavy duty power and Seal Minder® cable for operating in harsh construction environments.

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Oil accumulator system
Val-Matic Valve & Manufacturing Corp. (Elmhurst, Ill.); www.valmatic.com

The Skid Mounted Oil Accumulator systems are commonly used in facilities to provide clean and reliable supply pressure to cylinder operated control valves even after power failure. Model OA is a closed-loop, self-contained unit, which requires no external air or oil to operate. This model is comprised of five components, which include atmospheric oil sump, hydropneumatic tank, dual oil pumps, dual air compressors, and the electrical panel. The company offers systems that can handle as much as 400 gal.

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Ultrafiltration system
SUEZ Water Technologies & Solutions (Trevose, Pa.); www.suezwatertechnologies.com

 

The ZeeWeed 700B-RMS provides one of the largest surface area modules, which allows customers greater treatment capacity in the same footprint. The integrated header concept in the system makes upgrading existing systems simple by replacing the module and rack to gain added treatment capacity. The system’s inside-out ultrafiltration membranes can be used for drinking water, seawater reverse osmosis pre-treatment, and tertiary treatment for water reuse. They are suitable for both new and retrofit water treatment projects.

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Front-end loader
Toter® (Charlotte, N.C.); www.toter.com

The redesigned front-end loader line offers the toughness and strength of steel without the noise, corrosion, or added weight. Other features include steel rod reinforcement, ribbed bottom wear chimes for enhanced durability, double-walled lift pockets to distribute weight for maximum pocket strength, and integrated bumpers to protect the container. The models also feature quick change caster brackets and replaceable lift pockets. They are purpose-built for heavy-duty applications using the company’s proprietary Advanced Rotational Molding™ process, which ensures durability, provides additional reinforcements, and reduces the risk of cracking.

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Scan cameras
Chromasens (Poway, Calif.); www.chromasens.com

 

The 3DPIXA dual 200 µm HR employs factory-calibrated, stereo cameras that enable the simultaneous acquisition of 2D-color images along with either a height map or 3D-point cloud. The camera is ideal in surface inspection of automobiles for cosmetic flaws like dings, dents, and wrinkles in body panels, as well as for detection of functional flaws such as irregularities on the bearing surfaces of automotive rocker arms or the correct spacing and size of mounting holes on disk brake pads. The camera also can verify the presence or absence of parts and the correctness of their shapes in the case of gears, which can have missing or malformed teeth. It can be used in assembly verification to ensure error-free assembly, as is the case with closure panels that include doors, hoods, lift gates, and tail gates.

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