This month's topics: Energy savings • Workforce empowerment • Pumps and motors • Nutrient removal

June 2019 • Volume 31 • Number 6

This month's featured content

Building an Energy Program
Engagement of operations and maintenance staff and energy efficiency partners
Tonya Zinzer and Nicolas Varela

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Seeking Wastewater Excellence
The operations community faces challenges and opportunities to create the treatment facilities and workforce of the future
Grant Weaver

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Assessing Rubber Expansion Joints
Does the easy fix always mean the right fix?
John E. Koch and Greta Gilman

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What Is the Cost for Optimizing a WRRF for Nutrient Removal?
Factors to consider when pushing facilities to do more
Michael Falk, JB Neethling, Dave Reardon, and Holly Kennedy

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Features

Building an Energy Program
Engagement of operations and maintenance staff and energy efficiency partners
Tonya Zinzer and Nicolas Varela

Clean Water Services (CWS; Hillsboro, Ore.) has spent several years expanding its energy efficiency program to focus on capital, operations, and maintenance changes. Since 2007, CWS has implemented more than 70 energy saving projects and saved annually more than 9,000,000 kWh/yr. These improvements have been successful by involving staff from the local energy efficiency program, which is Energy Trust of Oregon (Portland, Ore.), as well as CWS supervisory, operations, and maintenance staff at each facility. CWS has developed a program that results in lasting energy savings and a strong partnership with local resources.

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Seeking Wastewater Excellence
The operations community faces challenges and opportunities to create the treatment facilities and workforce of the future
Grant Weaver

Within the water sector, the status quo states that new permit limits equal a facility upgrade. But this line of thinking waste resources and holds back good people.

Sadly, for most of us, it is far riskier to try something new than to stick with the old. Because this holds true for people who operate water resource recovery facilities (WRRFs), we are hesitant to change our day-to-day operations. Because this is true for people who design and review wastewater facilities, both the design engineer and state reviewer are motivated to add new elements to wastewater designs rather than seek operational fixes.

All of this drives up the cost of WRRFs and squanders the expertise of talented operators. It is time to change the status quo. The way forward is simple, but not easy. We must provide permittees with the time to experiment with different ways of operating existing equipment, encourage innovation, empower operators to risk failure, ensure proper training and knowledge transfer, and reward wastewater excellence.

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Assessing Rubber Expansion Joints
Does the easy fix always mean the right fix?
John E. Koch and Greta Gilman

Two pipes don’t line up. The temptation might be to join them with a flexible pump connector; that way, if the pipes don’t cooperate, material like rubber will provide the needed give to make it work. Plus, because it’s flexible, you’ll have lower nozzle loads on your equipment.

This kind of thinking may sound logical, but it typically creates more problems. The two main consequences are increased vibration levels across the system and more force being applied on the pump.

There are known instances where the vibration level in the plane of a discharging pipe dropped significantly when an expansion joint was removed and replaced by a rigid pipe section.

Close examination of two such facilities led to some important revelations. These revelations validate the recommendation that rubber expansion joints should not be used in conventional process wastewater and water pumping systems.

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What Is the Cost for Optimizing a WRRF for Nutrient Removal?
Factors to consider when pushing facilities to do more
Michael Falk, JB Neethling, Dave Reardon, and Holly Kennedy

What does it really mean to optimize a water resource recovery facility (WRRF) for nutrient removal? Is it reducing costs? Reducing nutrient discharges? Can both objectives be simultaneously achieved?

Nutrient optimization desires can stem from many causes but two main ones are permit requirements or preparation for downstream potable reuse. Increasingly stringent discharge limits typically come into play simultaneously with upgrades and expansions while transitioning from secondary treatment to advanced nutrient removal or during permit renewal. Likewise, when potable reuse is being considered, optimizing the upstream WRRFs for nutrient removal can help to minimize downstream potable reuse treatment costs.

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News

Every Single Drop
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti hopes to achieve a second 'Mulholland Moment' by reusing 100% of the city' wastewater
Justin Jacques

After $23 million in investments and years of back-breaking labor by more than 5,000 workers, William Mulholland, then Los Angeles’ chief water engineer, gave the order to open the gates of the Los Angeles Aqueduct for the first time on Nov. 5, 1913.

As water from the Eastern Sierra Nevada Mountains began to flow south toward thirsty Los Angeles – a time now known by Angelenos as the ‘Mulholland Moment’ – Mulholland famously declared, “There it is – take it.” By 1920, Los Angeles had more than tripled in size.

In February 2019, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti announced plans to reclaim 100% of the city’s wastewater for reuse by 2035. 

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Battle Continues Against 'Flushable' Wipes
New York City and U.K. groups educate on proper disposal and U.K. manufacturer receives "Fit to Flush" certification
LaShell Stratton-Childers

Municipalities and utilities worldwide continue to fight the war against non-flushable wipes. New York City launched a public awareness campaign in February to discourage residents from improperly disposing of fats, oils, and grease (FOG); wipes; and trash that clog sewer pipes and help create the infamous “fatbergs.” Meanwhile, in London in March, two environmental groups — Thames 21 and Thames River Watch — held an event where more than 100 volunteers cleaned up a site along the River Thames in West London. They removed hundreds of trash bags worth of wet wipes. And finally, the U.K.-based company, Bodywise (UK) Ltd. (Bristol, England), is doing its part to lessen the burden of wet wipes in collection systems by manufacturing the United Kingdom’s first certified flushable wet wipe.

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From the Editors

Bringing Together People and Technology

Nutrient removal always remains at the top of the topic list. We include it on the editorial calendar more than anything else because you request it and seek it out. Not surprisingly the WEFTEC 2019 Technical Program is shaping up to include nutrients as a leading focus again. We know that more strict permits drive the need, but you provide the ingenuity and knowhow to create the many different approaches to meeting the limits.

You size up what facilities and processes you have available and formulate an operational plan, or you design the new expansion or retrofit that’s needed to get the job done and create a budget and timeline for construction. Equipment and facilities dictate whether you aim for chemical treatment or biological phosphorus removal or seek to implement the Modified Ludzack-Ettinger process or aim for simultaneous nitrification–denitrification.

But you also consider the people side of the equation. Can the operators you have today handle the new process? Will it require more of their time? Would they need more training? And what happens when the seasoned expert retires in a few years?

Two feature articles examine these two integral parts of nutrient projects. “Seeking Wastewater Excellence” (p. 34) highlights the need to empower operators to seek new solutions with existing facilities and to encourage collaboration across all parts of the water sector. “What Is the Cost for Optimizing a WRRF for Nutrient Removal?” (p. 44) tackles the technology side. This article identifies the nutrient removal cost centers and discusses how they interact and should be thought through.

— The editors

Splash Shot

Houston Water gets new thermal dryers

In the nation’s fourth largest city, Houston, Texas, the Almeda Sims Water Resource Recovery Facility serves as one of Houston’s two solids drying facilities. Combined, the two facilities produce approximately 45,000 dry tons of biosolids per year. Houston Water produces a heat-dried, Class A biosolids product called Hou-Actinite that is marketed and sold for land application as a sterile and pelletized nutrient-rich fertilizer.

Two new drums were ordered, manufactured in Europe and transported on a 15-day journey by ship to Galveston, Texas. Each of the drums weighed 30,812 kg (68,000 lb). They measured 12,918-m (42.38-ft) long and 3.6 m (11.88 ft) in diameter. Here, Felicia Rhymer, Senior Project Manager, stands next to one of the drums to provide a perspective on just how large these units are. 

Ensuring the smooth operation of the biosolids program are dedicated and passionate staff members. Part of this team is a diverse group of women who fill various roles in administration, engineering, project management, regulatory compliance, operations, and executive capacities. Each plays an integral part in the success of the biosolids program and in protecting Houston’s waterways. Houston Water is attracting diverse candidates with different perspectives, and, in turn, leading to better solutions for our environment. This photo includes representatives from Pakistan, St. Tomas, Nigeria, China, Peru, Iraq, Senegal, Panama, Jamaica, and the United States. This is truly a global team. 

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Research Notes

Modified Aerogels Degrade Hard-to-Remove Antibiotics in Wastewater

Researchers from Tallinn University of Technology (TUT; Tallinn, Estonia) developed a new method to produce organic aerogels for water treatment applications using byproducts from local industries. By further modifying the aerogel, which has natural absorptive properties because of its porosity and large surface area, the researchers created a catalyst to help break down such pharmaceuticals as the antibiotic trimethoprim (TMP) in wastewater.

Oil shale processing in Estonia generates several phenolic compounds including 2,6-Dihydroxy-4-methylbenzoic acid (dHMBA) and 5-methylresorcinol (MR). Those compounds are generally discarded as waste, according to a paper by the university researchers that appeared in the Chemical Engineering Journal.

Using carbon dioxide, the researchers performed supercritical fluid extraction to produce aerogels from dHMBA and MR. The chemical characteristics of the two phenolic compounds enabled the aerogels to form quickly at room temperature, as opposed to conventional production approaches that require sustained temperatures of as much as 100°C (212°F) over longer periods of time.

Because TMP is resistant to natural degradation under sunlight and air, the researchers then doped their aerogels with the light-sensitive metals iron, copper, cobalt, and nickel, creating “catalyst carriers” that can oxygenate, demethylate, and degrade TMP in water.                      

Testing the material in pharmaceutical-heavy wastewater samples revealed that aerogels doped with nickel most efficiently degraded TMP, according to the study.

Novel materials enable new and effective applications in technology, said the study’s co-author Mihkel Koel in a February TUT release. “Until now, cleaning water from pharmaceutical waste has been extremely complicated and not very effective.”

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Also in this section:

  • Providing Customer Feedback Promotes Water Conservation, But Only Temporarily

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Waterline

Co-Digesting Food Waste Alongside Wastewater Solids Benefits Biogas Production

Water resource recovery facilities (WRRFs) in Singapore routinely process wastewater solids into biogas, which can in turn be refined into energy.

However, according to the results of a 2-year pilot project overseen by the Singapore Public Utilities Board (PUB) and the National Environment Agency of Singapore (NEA), the island nation could stand to generate almost three times as much biogas if its WRRFs co-digested both wastewater solids and food waste at the same time.

Beginning in December 2016, 23 businesses, schools, and other community buildings collected food waste on-site in specialized receptacles. The food waste then was mixed with wastewater solids before undergoing anaerobic digestion at a demonstration facility constructed at PUB’s Ulu Pandan Water Reclamation Plant. In all, the demonstration facility processed as much as 40,000 kg/d (88,180 lbs/d) of the mixture, according to a joint PUB and NEA release.

The chemical interplay between the food waste and wastewater solids produced about 40% more biogas compared to processing the two streams separately. If food waste digestion was as common in Singapore’s WRRFs as wastewater solids digestion, the agencies estimate that total biogas production could reach as high as 300% of the present rate.

"Food waste is a waste stream which all of us are familiar with. What may be less well-known is its low recycling rate, at only 16%, which is well below Singapore’s overall recycling rate of about 60%,” said Tan Meng Dui, CEO of NEA, in the release. By furthering the practice of co-digestion, Singapore could slash both waste and energy costs, Tan said. 

PUB now plans to co-digest food waste and wastewater solids into biogas at its new Tuas Integrated Waste Management Facility and Tuas Water Reclamation Plant, collectively known as the Tuas Nexus. The complex is expected to open in 2025.

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Also in this section:

  • New Models Map Ecological Responses to Dam Removal

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Operator Essentials

What Every Operator Should Know About Electric Motors and Troubleshooting
Fred Edgecomb

The wastewater treatment process would not be able to run without the use of electric motors. While wastewater operators are not and should not be expected to know everything about handling electric motors, having basic familiarity with the concept will improve worker safety. In this issue's Operator Essentials section, Water Environment Federation (Alexandria, Va.) Facility Operations and Maintenance Committee member Fred Edgecomb covers the basics of electric motors, including components, operations, and troubleshooting.

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Facility Focus

City of Monticello Wastewater Utility

Location: Monticello, Ind.
Startup date: 1948
Service population: 5,378
Number of employees: 6
Design flow: 13.6 ML/d (3.6 mgd) peak
Average daily flow: 6 ML/d (1.6 mgd)

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The City of Monticello, Ind., sits nestled between Lake Shafer to the north and Lake Freeman to the south. Construction of two dams on the Tippecanoe River — the Norway dam in 1923 and Oakdale dam in 1925 — created the lakes, which have become popular recreational areas. Through the years, the Monticello water resource recovery facility (WRRF) has gone through numerous upgrades to embrace projected regulations, add capacity for economic growth, and enhance environmental stewardship to protect natural resources. The most recent upgrade was completed in 2017, said David Adam Downey, wastewater superintendent at the city of Monticello.

The tertiary, advanced biological nutrient removal facility produces Class B biosolids. It uses an extended-aeration activated sludge process with anaerobic and anoxic zones. Biosolids produced are land-applied. Monticello WRRF’s
high-level of treatment ensures the city can continue providing quality service to residents and rate payers while minimizing costs of operations and keeping user rates manageable, Downey said.

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Projects

The Hollister (Calif.) Water Reclamation Facility, which is operated and maintained by Veolia North America (Boston), has been recognized with the Safety Plant of the Year Award by the Monterey Bay section of the California Water Environment Association (CWEA) for its commitment to ensuring the facility is operated safely for both employees and the community.

The award is part of the CWEA’s annual effort to recognize public water and wastewater facilities for outstanding performance.

Veolia operates and maintains the Hollister facility, treating domestic, commercial, and industrial wastewater and producing reclaimed water for agriculture, which includes table crops, park irrigation, airport greenery, and groundwater recharge.

In the 8 years since Veolia assumed operations, the facility has not recorded a single safety violation, which equates to more than 3,100 consecutive days without any violations.

The facility uses a full spectrum of safety policies and practices to ensure the highest standards are being met, including daily safety “tailgate” meetings with employees, monthly training exercises, specialized safety courses, and a Safety-First program empowering employees to act when safety issues take place.

The facility has been recognized with numerous other awards in recent years, including the Plant of the Year Award from CWEA’s Monterey Bay section in 2015 and 2017, and a Pacific Gas & Electric award for energy conservation efforts made by the staff.

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Also in this section:

  • Xylem (Rye Brook, N.Y.)
  • START Centre (Singapore)
  • Memsift Innovations Pte Ltd. (Singapore)

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Business

Motion Industries Inc. (Birmingham, Ala.) promoted Pamela Sims to vice president of marketing. Sims joined the company in 2004. She most recently served as director of marketing since 2013.

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Nanostone Water (Waltham, Mass.) hired Joseph Gifford as vice president of research and development. Gifford will lead research and product development for the company’s water worldwide.

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The Water Technology Acceleration Project (WaterTAP) Board of Directors (Toronto, Ontario, Canada)announced that Tanja McQueen has been elected to board chair, succeeding Rick VanSant who remains an active director and vice chair. The board also welcomes its four new directors Helge Daebel, Paul Gibson, Rita Theil, and John Walker. Together, they will guide the organization in its mandate to promote and strengthen Ontario’s water sector.

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WAGO (Germantown, Wis.) appointed Laura Dickinson to its marketing communications department team. Dickinson will take over the duties as the public relations coordinator overseeing the company’s publicity, editorial content, social media, and other written material. WAGO also hired Edward (Ed) Naczek as product manager for DIN Rail Mount Terminal Blocks.

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Also in this section:

  • American Membrane Technology Association (Stuart, Fla.)
  • Aquionics(Charlotte, N.C.)
  • Bonita Springs Utilities Inc. (Bonita Springs, Fla.)
  • Freese and Nichols Inc. (Austin, Texas)
  • WSP USA (New York)
  • Duperon Corp. (Saginaw, Mich.)
  • Mott MacDonald (Iselin, N.J.)
  • Sulzer(Winterthur, Switzerland)

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Water Volumes

A Guide to Cyanobacteria: Identification and Impact
Mark A. Nienaber and Miriam Steinitz-Kannan, The University Press of Kentucky, © 2018, The University Press of Kentucky, 186 p., $20.00, Paperback; ISBN 978-0-81317559-1 (paper), ISBN 978-0-81317561-4 (pdf), ISBN 978-0-81317560-7 (e-pub)

An alternative title for this book could be The Cyanobacteria Bible; it has all the information on cyanobacteria that you need to know, systematically organized in encyclopaedia style. This should be the number one reference on this topic for students, amateur microbiologists, aquatic ecologists, or anyone in general interested in cyanobacteria.

The intended audience for A Guide to Cyanobacteria is very broad. It should be accessible for all who love the outdoors, to learn how to identify many of these microorganisms. Jargon is avoided; it can be understood by anyone with interest in the topic.

This is not a book to read through; it is a book to have on the shelf and use actively for study and field work. It does not claim to be complete, so that the strictly academic ambition may be limited, but the outcome is still impressive. It starts from the basics, defining cyanobacteria in a simple way, even explaining which concentration units are used; there is also a chapter on qualitative and quantitative analysis. A very useful chapter is the one describing cyanobacteria from anatomy to environment. One of the key features of cyanobacteria, their toxicity, is described in brief.

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Products

Generator
De Nora (Milan, Italy); www.denora.com

The ClorTec® DN Gen II electrochlorination is designed to offer greater on-site sodium hypochlorite generation efficiency, easier operation, and less maintenance. Upgrades to the system include a new design that allows the duty and standby units to be mounted on the same frame, saving as much as 50% of the footprint. Other improvements include 100% access to every component, making operation and maintenance simple, and a proprietary liquid flow backboard that can be located anywhere in the building for additional flexibility. Additional features ensure optimal performance and efficiency including new non-intrusive level switch and temperature sensor design, optional split flow technology, and new water and brine flow controls. 

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Switches
Antaira Technologies (Brea, Calif.); www.antaira.com  

The Antaira’s LNX-0500-M12-67 M12 IP67 layer two series switches have been designed specifically for harsh industrial environments. The 5-year warranty guarantees reliable operation in applications that are subject to high vibration and shock. The redundant power inputs of 12 to 48 VDC through an M12 5-pin A-coded male connector ensures availability and uptime. The IP67 rating signifies these switches can withstand large volumes of water and submersion for up to 1 min. Other features include a wide operating temperature of -10° to 70°C in the standard model and -40° to 75°C in the extended temperature model.

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Analyzer
Electro-Chemical Devices (Anaheim, Calif.); www.ecdi.com 

Electro-Chemical Devices Total Organic Carbon Analyzer with non-dispersive infrared detection technology is a full-featured instrument that utilizes the ultraviolet persulfate oxidation method, which detects generated carbon dioxide using its highly stable non-dispersive infra-red detector for analysis. The analyzer’s advanced design features a valve-free sample line, which largely eliminates blockages. Its auto clean, auto-calibration, and auto-validation functions guarantee correct, reliable values that can be reproduced at any time without the need for manual intervention unlike conventional analyzers where the flow is controlled by a glass tube rotameter. The carrier gas flow is controlled digitally. The analyzer compartment is rated IP54, NEMA 3, and conforms to EN610004-2, EN610004-4, C46-022, EN 55022 and EN 61326, and is housed in a dual-compartment enclosure.

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Monitor
TRU-Vu Monitors Inc. (Arlington Heights, Ill.); www.tru-vumonitors.com

The SXOBH-43-XTR sunlight readable waterproof monitors are ideal for use in nearly any environment where bright light, water, dirt, dust, or airborne contaminants would damage a standard monitor. The monitor offers excellent image quality as well as the ultimate protection against the elements. The 43-in. screen features 1920 x 1080 full HD resolution and more than 2500 nits of brightness — 10 times brighter than a standard monitor. The screen is optically bonded and protected via 5 mm anti-reflective, impact resistant.

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Stormwater Treatment System
StormwateRx LLC (Portland, Ore.); www.stormwaterx.com

The Purus Nitrate targets soluble nitrate in industrial stormwater runoff. This system is ideal for industries where nitrogen compounds or petroleum products are used or where organic materials are processed, including fabricated metal products, food processing, and chemical manufacturing. The system is normally installed and flow-matched in a treatment-train configuration with the company’s Aquip stormwater filtration technology, an upstream pre-filtration system.

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Variable-Frequency Drive
ABB (Zürich); www.abb.com

The ACQ580 variable-frequency drive enhances pump performance, simplifies operation, and improves flow in pumping and aeration applications. The drive’s innovative software, intuitive keypad, and menu-driven programming simplify the operation of even the most complex applications. The keypad optional Bluetooth capability provides flexibility and an extra level of safety for commissioning and troubleshooting. The product range includes 1 to 700 hp and 480 V, to be followed by the 100 hp and 240 V, and 300 hp and 600 V. It is available in enclosure classes UL Type 1 and 12.

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Detector
Markland Specialty Engineering Ltd. (Georgetown, Ontario, Canada); www.sludgecontrols.com

 

The Automatic Sludge Blanket Level Detector enables water and wastewater treatment facilities to measure, monitor, and control solid-liquid interface levels in clarifiers and sedimentation basins, including dissolved air flotation units; sequencing batch reactors; the constricted area of lamellas; and automate the removal of primary, secondary, and backwash silt/sludge. The detector enables users to program de-sludge pumps to operate only when necessary, reducing energy usage, wear-and-tear on pumps, and downtime for maintenance. In addition, it helps in preventing carryover and optimizing feed density for enhanced dewatering. The detector automatically adjusts the beam power intensity of the LED-phototransistor sensors in its vertical probe, enabling it to accommodate thick or thin biosolids concentrations, or light flocs, such as in the overlying cloud layer. No calibration required.

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Sensors
Flowline (Los Alamitos, Calif.); www.flowline.com

The EchoTouch® Reflective-Ultrasonic™ Liquid Level sensorswork in condensation. By orienting the transducer vertically, condensation runs off the unimpeded transducer face to deliver reliable level measurement. The transmitters are offered in small and bulk tank versions with optional push button display or software configuration and HART® communication.

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Telehandler
Bobcat (Seoul); www.bobcat.com

The Bobcat TL43.80HF is a compact telehandler with a width of 2.30 m and a length of less than 5 m from the rear to the fork face. It offers a range of 15 different rigid frame telehandler models, covering maximum lifting capacities between 2.6 and 4.3 ton, and maximum lifting heights from 6 m to 18 m. The system provides a new solution for heavy lift handling applications found in general industry, manufacturing, building materials, warehousing, quarrying, and mining. It also is ideal for heavy duty, high-productivity segment of the agricultural market, taking lift capacity, lifting height, and breakout force to unprecedented levels. It is available with a choice of three different AGRI packs for the farming market.

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Water Meter
KROHNE Inc. (Beverly, Mass.); www.krohne.com

The WATERFLUX 3070 is the first all-in-one water meter with integrated pressure and temperature sensor. Simplified installation, integrated diagnostics, a long battery lifetime, remote communication options, and low overall maintenance make the meter ideal for installation in remote locations. The updated meter now offers a main power option with battery backup, and a Modbus RTU communication option for transmission of readings, meter status, and alarms. The polycarbonate converter housing with protection class IP68 rating is now standard for both compact and remote versions. The meter features IP68 waterproof plug and play connectors that don’t require wiring onsite, and a small installation footprint to fit into electrical cabinets.

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Adsorbents
CycloPure (Encinitas, Calif.); www.cyclopure.com

The DEXSORB line of cyclodextrin-based adsorbents selectively target and remove hazardous micropollutants from drinking water. The substance’s flexible formulations allow for its broad use in water treatment systems that serve communities, businesses, and households for applications that range from filtered water bottles to large municipal facilities. Derived from renewable corn-based cyclodextrin, the adsorbents represent a new class of water treatment adsorbents that safely eliminate such harmful chemicals as polyfluoroalkyl substances and perfluorooctane sulfonate, pesticides, and pharmaceutical compounds.

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Operations Software
Schneider Electric (Knightdale, N.C.); www.schneider-electric.us

The EcoStruxure™ augmented operator advisor software brings together physical, real-life objects with virtual objects to increase operational efficiency, reduce costs, and improve proactive maintenance. The system’s interface gives operators access to information in the field for operations and maintenance. It allows for fast diagnosis without lockout or electrical qualification and provides opportunity for safe and rapid detection of abnormalities and access to key performance indicators. The plug-and-play architecture works on tablets such as iOS® and has Android and Windows® versions in progress. It uses a Windows-based PC as the server platform. The system can be used in mining, minerals and metals, water and wastewater, food and beverage, and infrastructure. It also can be adapted for any industrial domain.

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LED Lighting
Larson Electronics LLC (Kemp, Texas); www.larsonelectronics.com

The EPL-LP-48-LED-SFC.LP is a Class I, Divisions 1 and 2, Class II Divisions 1 and 2 rated extra low-profile LED light fixture that provides 13,520 lumens of high-quality light drawing just 104W. This integrated linear LED uses special positioned boards within the fixture to provide wide area light without sacrificing quality or output. The LED produces a brilliant wide flood beam with 100º horizontal and 140º vertical spreads and has a standard 5000K color temperature to produce colors and details more accurately than traditional luminaries. The light operates on 100-277VAC, 50/60Hz current without any modifications and comes equipped with terminal strips for wiring.

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Pumps
Watson-Marlow Fluid Technology Group (Wilmington, Mass.); www.wmftg.com

The Qdos pump has mobile and remote applications and can be powered by a 12-24V DC power supply that can boost productivity and cut chemical waste via more accurate, linear, and repeatable metering than conventional solenoid or stepper-driven diaphragm metering pumps. Users can reduce chemical costs even when metering difficult fluids, or when pressure, viscosity, and solids content vary. This capability combines with peristaltic technology to ensure precise, continuous, smooth flow for optimal fluid mixing.

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Router
Digi International® (Hopkins, Minn.); www.digi.com

The Digi IX14 router provides reliable, efficient, low-cost IoT connectivity for devices located in rugged, demanding environments. The system contains an LTE modem capable of 3G fallback for North America, and a soon-to-be-released version will support 3G/2G fallback for Europe. The system has been physically hardened to withstand extreme environmental conditions with MIL-STD-810G certification for shock, vibration, and temperature, and an IP54 rating for dust and water resistance. 

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Gas Detection
Industrial Scientific (Pittsburgh, Pa.); www.indsci.com

The RGX Gateway enables designated safety contacts to receive real-time alerts for gas hazards, panic, and man-down situations happening in plant or in the field. A live map shows the location of workers and current conditions, therefore improving response times and arming emergency personnel with critical information. The system is compatible with Ventis® Pro Series Multi-Gas monitors and Radius® BZ1 Area monitors. Through the LENS™ wireless instrument-to-instrument mesh communication system, the monitors share gas readings and alarms with one another and the RGX gateway. The gateway then transmits readings through cell, Wi-Fi, or Ethernet to iNet® Now Live monitoring software, which alerts key team members within seconds of an incident.

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Adhesive
Master Bond (Hackensack, N.J.); www.masterbond.com

Master Bond has developed a formulation of opaque colored compounds, which represents a breakthrough in ultraviolet (UV)/visible light curing adhesive technology. These unique innovative environmentally-friendly products possess the capability of curing in a wide range of colors while offering the same combination of beneficial properties exhibited by transparent curing systems. They require no mixing, cure in seconds upon exposure to an appropriate commercial UV/visible light source, have excellent adhesive strength, thermal stability, chemical/moisture resistance, and electrical insulative properties. LED401 white is opaque white in color. It is a one-part system that cures fully upon exposure to a 405 nm wavelength light source.

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