This month's topics: Odor control • Disaster resilience • Wildfire fallout • Workforce diversity

February 2019 • Volume 31 • Number 2

This month's featured content

Fly, swim, or crawl your way to safer work conditions
Drones are driving worker safety and creating efficiency in water system inspections
Marc Gandillon

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Odor management and control
Understanding liquid-stream fundamentals
Vaughan Harshman, Ryan McKenna, and Chris Moody

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From the trenches
Loading up your tool bag
Richard R. Roll and Michael S. Eagler, Sr.

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After the blaze
Researchers study how wildfires affect water treatment
LaShell Stratton-Childers

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Features

Fly, swim, or crawl your way to safer work conditions
Drones are driving worker safety and creating efficiency in water system inspections
Marc Gandillon

For workers in the water sector, inherent workplace conditions expose them to daily potential for serious injury. Working in the confined spaces under city streets often comes with awkward postures, incessant vibrations, extreme temperatures, and hazardous gases that can injure. For workers dealing with chemicals or risking exposure to known viruses, bacteria, protozoa, and parasites, the risks become even more complicated. Physical inspection of tanks, pipes, and reservoirs — regardless of provided safety precautions — often require workers to step into environments that carry these risks as well as potential for catastrophic physical traumas.

Now, the burgeoning drone industry is bringing numerous purpose-built solutions to the aid of water and wastewater agencies looking for safer, more efficient, and more affordable options.

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Odor management and control
Understanding liquid-stream fundamentals
Vaughan Harshman, Ryan McKenna, and Chris Moody

Odor control is an operational strategy utilized at water resource recovery facilities (WRRFs) and in the wastewater collection system to mitigate nuisance odors in surrounding communities. Depending on the design criteria, odor control can assist with worker health and safety considerations, as well as decrease the production of corrosive conditions that affect the useful life of treatment system infrastructure.

Unlike most operational aspects of a WRRF, odor emissions from the facility can have a direct, immediate, and most importantly, noticeable effect on the surrounding community. Odors from WRRFs are often perceived by the public as a nuisance and foul odors affect quality of life and can potentially affect property values.

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News

Instructors prep utilities for the worst-case scenario
Texas university offers instructions in disaster preparation and recovery for water and wastewater utilities
LaShell Stratton-Childers

Climate change does not bode well for water and wastewater utilities. According to a report released by the Union of Concerned Scientists (Cambridge, Mass.), because the earth has warmed as a result of climate change, “the probability of a storm with precipitation levels like Hurricane Harvey was higher in Texas in 2017 than it was at the end of the twentieth century. Because of climate change, such a storm evolved from a once in every 100 years event to a once in every 16 years event over this time period.”

Hurricanes like Harvey can lead to major flooding as well as strain on water resource recovery facilities (WRRFs) because of the rapid influx of flows. Both can adversely affect utilities and their surrounding communities. Because the frequency of these “once-in-a-lifetime” natural disasters are increasing, according to many scientists, utilities must be prepared and have emergency response plans in place. Classes like those offered by the Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service (TEEX; College Station, Texas) do that for utility managers and employees, covering both natural and man-made disasters in their intensive coursework.

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After the blaze
Researchers study how wildfires affect water treatment
LaShell Stratton-Childers

After a wildfire, a community has many things to deal with: loss of life, loss of infrastructure, the short- and long-term effects on wildlife, and the cost to recover. But few, if any, have investigated how wildfires affect drinking water treatment. According to a report by researchers at University of Colorado–Boulder (CU Boulder) and Washington State University (Pullman), wildfires can contaminate nearby streams and watersheds through mobilization of sediments, nutrients, and dissolved organic matter. These extra pollutants can strain the capabilities of downstream municipal treatment facilities.

“A great number of drinking water utilities draw water from forested watersheds,” said Fernando Rosario-Ortiz, an associate professor in the CU Boulder Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering and the lead author of the report, in a June 19 press release. “When these watersheds are impacted by a wildfire, the impacts on source water quality can be severe, forcing utilities to respond in order to continue to provide safe drinking water to their customers.”

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Extra

Women in Water: The tide is slowly rising
Mary Bufe

In the late 1990s, when Kishia Powell was an engineering intern for the City of Baltimore Bureau of Water and Wastewater, her supervisor gave her a work assignment she will never forget. Her task: to check the city phone directory to ensure it listed only working numbers.

In retrospect, it probably wasn’t the best way to lure a standout African-American female STEM college student into the water sector — especially when that student glanced up from her phone number-checking duties to see her male counterparts working on what she later called “all the sexy jobs.”

And so it is for many women in STEM careers in the water sector (and others).

In terms of numbers, things are looking up. A 2016 workplace experiences study by the Society of Women Engineers (Chicago) found a 54% increase in women being awarded bachelor’s degrees in engineering and computer science between 2011 and 2016. More than one in five of these degrees today are awarded to females, with women of color accounting for 5.6% of engineering degrees alone.

But once women engineers enter the workforce, they report a mixed bag of experiences. 

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Splash Shot

Gathering riverbed sediment cores to measure long-term metal concentrations in water

For about a month, beginning in November 2018, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and other federal agencies partnered with the Utah Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to gather sediment cores from Lake Powell. Able to hold more than 24 million acre-feet of water, Lake Powell is one of the largest man-made U.S. reservoirs.
Scientists hope results of the sediment core analysis, which are expected in early 2020, will lead to a better understanding of how watershed-scale factors like flash floods and runoff pollution affect the lake’s distribution of potentially harmful metals, according to a DEQ release.

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From the Editors

Using new tools, hands-on experience, reliable solutions

Technology is providing a new suite of tools that enable operators and designers to work safer and smarter. These new devices can help avoid dangerous tasks as well as generate more sharable and objective data for analysis.

For example, operators no longer need to risk life and limb tending to collapsed pipes and sewer tunnels, examining sediment buildup at the bottom of holding tanks, or entering narrow and confined spaces. “Fly, swim, or crawl your way to safer work conditions,” details how drone technology can eliminate these risks. 

However, moving from theory to practice in the water sector isn’t always as slick as using a new app. Sometimes just finding the right access point can be a challenge that requires some creativity and reliance on field-proven ingenuity. This month’s installment of From the Trenches, titled “Loading up your tool bag,” covers the range of what can work from satellite imagery to floating oranges. As long as a safety frame of mind is maintained, whatever works works.

Likewise, knowing the likely causes and treatment options for different parameters is paramount for all water sector workers. The article, “Odor management and control”, provides a quick review of where odors start and what can be done to handle them. This odor control primer can serve as a refresher for seasoned experts as well as an introduction for water-sector newcomers.

— The editors

From the Trenches

Loading up your tool bag
Richard R. Roll and Michael S. Eagler, Sr.

Engineers: How extensive did your undergraduate classes go into investigative and diagnostic measures for sewer system evaluations? The basics are straightforward, and include visual manhole inspections, dye testing, smoke testing, and closed-circuit television (CCTV) sewer inspections. But what does one do when these methods are insufficient to identify or locate a problem in the collection system? As the old saying goes, “When your only tool is a hammer, your solution to every problem will be a nail.”

For example, consider the utility that had to locate a shaft vault on a deep tunnel system that had been completely built over during urban renewal in the 1970s. Not a single surface feature remained to begin the excavation that would allow the utility to find the access opening into the vault. The utility compared aerial imagery before and after urban renewal to produce a general location, but it was imprecise. There were no known penetration points in which to inject dye or to watch for telltale smoke. There was, however, a six-story office building overlooking the suspected location of the vault that was in an adjoining parking lot. It provided the landowners a front-row seat to observe noninvasive and invasive measures, whether successful or not. No pressure!

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For a well-rounded, versatile engineer, technical and regulatory expertise must always remain a core competency. However, understanding and appreciating elements of human nature, team building, safe workplace practices, undocumented tribal knowledge, and unconventional diagnostic methods are just as important. These elements can’t be learned from books or most undergraduate courses. They will come from a blend of first-hand experience and memorable advice collected along the way.

In this series, some seasoned (and battle-scarred) professionals will try to ease the learning curve in collection system operations and maintenance for younger professionals by offering advice and insight based on real-life experiences.

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Research Notes

Larger cities consume less water per person, says Penn State

During a comparative study of direct and indirect water consumption by U.S. cities, researchers from Pennsylvania State University (PSU; University Park) discovered an unlikely correlation: as a city’s population grows, the water footprint of its residents shrinks.

The finding may be linked to how the economic structure of a city changes as its population expands, the researchers write. In their analysis, the team describes that the service sector tends to dominate cities above a certain size, shifting more water-intensive activities such as industrial production and agriculture away from densely populated areas.

To formulate their conclusion, the research team used data from the U.S. Department of Transportation that mapped the flow of commodities among 123 separate U.S. regions. Researchers isolated regions that covered metropolitan areas with populations greater than 50,000, arriving at 65 mid- to large-sized study cities spanning a range of climates.

The researcher used a popular model to predict how the social and economic structures of a city changes as its population rises and estimate the total water required to produce various commodities. The researchers standardized the 65 cities to allow them to compare each city’s water footprint based on the footprint of each individual resident. The analysis also considered the water footprint of U.S. exports and how water-use-efficiency trends differed among different water sources.

With notable exceptions —New Orleans had an abnormally large water footprint for its population, and Las Vegas fell well below its expected water footprint size — studied cities had smaller per-person footprints as their populations grew.

The researchers say their work can aid policymakers and city planners as they benchmark their own water efficiency against neighbors and develop new water conservation programs.

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Also in this section:

 

  • Light-powered, titanium dioxide filtration membranes slash cleaning and maintenance costs
  • Subduction injects three times as much water into Earth’s surface than previously estimated
  • ‘Hairy’ nanoparticle offers scaling resistance without environmental side effects

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Waterline

Metals found in mussel shells expose long-term effects of oil and gas wastewater

Researchers from Pennsylvania State University (University Park) and Union College (Schenectady, N.Y.) have discovered elevated concentrations of strontium, a metal linked to wastewater produced during oil and gas extraction, in the shells of freshwater mussels. This metal was found downstream from former hydraulic fracturing wastewater disposal sites in Pennsylvania.

State regulators discovered in 2011 that wastewater from hydraulic fracturing operations contained enough contaminants, even after treatment, to threaten drinking water and wildlife. Since then, reusing wastewater in the hydraulic fracturing process rather than treating and discharging it has become the norm.

Studying mussel shells is a useful way to examine the long-term environmental effects of wastewater exposure, said study co-author Nathaniel Warner. Mussels incorporate water into their shells as they grow. Scientists can peer into past water-quality conditions by analyzing specific substances in layers of mussel shell.

To arrive at their conclusion, researchers studied two species of freshwater mussels from the Alleghany River. They collected mussels both 100 m (328 ft) and 1 to 2 km (0.6 to 1.2 mi) downstream from a former oil and gas wastewater disposal site. As a control group, they also collected mussels from the Juniata and Delaware Rivers, which had no reported history of oil and gas discharge.

The team’s finding shows that the negative effects of hydraulic fracturing and other unconventional oil and gas drilling methods can persist long after operations end. The U.S. Department of Energy estimates that up to 95% of new wells drilled today will utilize hydraulic fracturing. Warner says his team hopes that this study will help inform best management practices for oil and gas wastewater.

“The wells are getting bigger, and they’re using more water, and they’re producing more wastewater, and that water has got to go somewhere,” Warner said. “Making the proper choices about how to manage that water is going to be pretty vital.”

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Also in this section:

  • New Zealand presses forward on wastewater drug-monitoring program
  • Bill Gates reveals 20 new sanitation tech designs at Reinvented Toilet Expo
  • Swedish study defines process and reuse potential of seafood industry wastewater

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Business

American Water (Voorhees, N.J.) announced that Michael Bentel, a doctoral student at the University of California, Riverside, has been chosen as the recipient of the American Water Works Association (AWWA) 2018 American Water scholarship.

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Jonathan Childs joined Barge Design Solutions Inc. (Nashville, Tenn.) as director of projects for the company’s water services business unit. He will lead project managers in delivery, execution, and support business development and strategic growth efforts. 

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Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. (Dallas) appointed Bryan Harvey as vice president of its utilities business based in London. Bryan is responsible for program and service delivery to the firm’s regulated utility clients in the water and energy markets in the U.K./European market. 

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Steve Tarallo joined Dewberry (Fairfax, Va.) as an associate vice president and manager of the water/wastewater practice in the firm’s Baltimore office. Tarallo served as a project director with responsibilities that included project management, business development, client relations, and professional staff oversight and supervision.

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Modern Water won a coveted 2018 New Product Innovation Award from Frost & Sullivan (San Antonio, Texas), an internationally recognized market research firm. Based on its strong overall performance, Modern Water’s Microtox® continuous toxicity monitor series was recognized for how it reduces the risk of missed toxicity events by taking two measurements per second, compared to conventional on-line toxicity monitors that only take intermittent samples and provide only one test result in 15-30 minutes.

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Also in this section:

  • Bioscience Inc. (Allentown, Pa.) 
  • Patriot Rail (Jacksonville, Fla.)
  • The World Resources Institute (Washington, D.C.)
  • Motion Industries Inc. (Birmingham, Ala.)
  • Lockwood, Andrews & Newnam Inc. (Houston)
  • Anue Water Technologies (Tucker, Ga.)
  • HDR (Omaha, Neb.)
  • Silicon Valley Clean Water Commission (Redwood City, Calif.)
  • Mott MacDonald (Iselin, N.J.)
  • KAI Design & Build (St. Louis)
  • Barge Design Solutions Inc. (Nashville, Tenn.)
  • Stanley Consultants (Muscatine, Iowa)
  • Badger Meter Inc. (Milwaukee)
  • Veolia North America (Boston)
  • Pace Analytical Services LLC (Minneapolis)
  • Brown and Caldwell (Walnut Creek, Calif.)
  • Wilson County (Nashville, Tenn.)
  • Cimbria Capital (Houston)
  • American Society of Civil Engineers
  • Reell Precision Manufacturing (Saint Paul, Minn.)
  • Pentair plc (London, United Kingdom)
  • Water Research Foundation (Denver)
  • Carl Data Solutions Inc. (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada)
  • Dur-A-Flex Inc. (East Hartford, Conn.)
  • Blacoh Industries (Riverside, Calif.)

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Water Volumes

Operation of Water Resource Recovery Facilities Study Guide

B. Ahmed, J.A. Brown, V. deSilva, G. Grissop, N. Jensen, M. Kasi, I. LaRue, D.M. Mason, and N. Naureen. Water Environment Federation (WEF), 601 Wythe Street, Alexandria, VA. 22314-1994;300 pp., $85; softcover, ISBN :978-1-57278-338-6.

This study guide is a companion to two other WEF publications: the seventh edition of Operation of Water Resource Recovery Facilities, Manual of Practice (MOP) 11 and a WEF video, Water Resource Recovery Facility 3D Virtual Tour. The video, manual, and study guide should be used together for training classes, studying for certification exams, and improving the quality of operations. This study guide was prepared by a WEF Task Force of the Technical Practice Committee Control Group, chaired by Eric Rothstein and vice chaired by D. Medina.

The video can be downloaded from the Internet free. It is a 10-minute, narrated educational video providing an excellent virtual tour of a typical water resource recovery facility. It covers such topics as wastewater treatment, water reuse, biosolids generation, land application, energy generation, anaerobic digestion, facility infrastructure, and wastewater treatment operation. Readers should download and view the WEF video first.

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Projects

The American Public Works Association (APWA; Kansas City, Mo.) announced the winners of its 2018 Public Works Projects of the Year competition. The awards program promotes excellence in the management and administration of public works projects while recognizing the alliance among the managing agency, the contractor, the consultant, and their cooperative achievements.

The project that was deemed best-in-class in the more than $75-million environment category by APWA was the $342-million Chambers Creek Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant expansion project by the Pierce County Planning & Public Works (University Place, Wash.). Supporting Pierce County’s future growth and economic development, the expansion project increased capacity at the water resource recovery facility (WRRF) from 108,600 m3/d (28.7 mgd) to 170,300 m3/d (45 mgd).

Brown and Caldwell (Walnut Creek, Calif.) led a project team that included Kennedy/Jenks (San Francisco) to design and manage construction of the upgrades, including the installation of a sidestream treatment process. Pierce County, Wash., was one of the first utilities in North America to pilot the de-ammonification method, which uses a naturally-occurring bacteria (anammox) to strip nitrogen from wastewater, reducing chemical use by 50% and oxygen demands by 25%.

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Ostara Nutrient Recovery Technologies Inc. (Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) signed a partnership with the City of Atlanta Department of Watershed Management to install and operate a nutrient recovery facility at the R.M. Clayton Water Reclamation Center (WRC), delivered under a design-build agreement and financed through a unique operating lease model.

 The R.M. Clayton WRC is required to meet regulatory limits on nutrient discharges. An extensive engineering review along with onsite pilot testing validated nutrient recovery as a solution that could address these compliance concerns as outlined in the City of Atlanta’s Department of Watershed Management Master Plan in 2014.

By recovering nutrients from the facility’s wastewater stream and converting them to continuous release fertilizer, Ostara’s technology helps R.M. Clayton WRC increase operational efficiencies through struvite avoidance and serves to protect the local watershed from nutrient pollution. The nutrient recovery process can recover 80% or more of the phosphorus and up to 15% of the ammonia-nitrogen from wastewater streams before they accumulate as struvite in pipes and equipment.

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Also in this section:

  • Ciel & Terre USA (Petaluma, Calif.) 
  • City of Lebanon, Tenn.
  • Aries Clean Energy (Franklin, Tenn.)
  • Orange County Water District (Fountain Valley, Calif.)
  • City of St. Cloud, Minn.
  • State of Massachusetts

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Products

Stormwater control calculator
Construction EcoServices (Houston); www.constructionecoservices.com

The smartPOND takes passive stormwater controls and gives them brains, allowing for either pre-programmed stormwater quantity and/or quality management that actively measures, settles pollutants, and releases stormwater to match your regulatory regime, as well as application-based, real-time automation that allows you to retain or release water at the tip of your fingers. The built-in telemetry makes users aware of upcoming system maintenance needs, sending alerts to users’ smartphones/email, with advanced notice of battery, solar panel, or other component maintenance needs. The system is the intelligent choice for your automated detention, retention, stormwater quality, or rainwater harvesting system.

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Air valve
Victaulic Bermad Technologies (Houston); www.bermad.com

The C50 is a highly quality combination of air valve for a variety of sewage and wastewater networks and operating conditions. The valve evacuates air during pipeline filling, allows efficient release of air from pressurized pipes, and enables large volumes air intake during network draining to prevent pipeline damage. With its advanced aerodynamic design, cleaning ports, double orifice, and robust corrosion-free composite design, this valve provides excellent protection against air/gas accumulation and vacuum formation with excellent sealing even under low pressure conditions. The valve is available in 2 in. and 3 in.

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Coupling
Krausz USA (Ocala, Fla.); krauszusa.com

The HYMAX 2 is the next generation of the HYMAX coupling, which introduced wide range couplings with two top-facing bolts and dynamic deflection. The coupling’s two top-facing bolts eliminate the need for extensive under pipe digging. The coupling features a T-handle to make it easy to carry and adjust on the pipe and can absorb post-installation dynamic pipe deflection of up to 4 degrees on each end, reducing the risk of damage and cracking due to ground shifts and temperature changes. The coupling has a range of up to 1.3 in. and can connect pipes of different materials and diameters.

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Variable frequency drives
Unitronic (Laval, Quebec, Canada); www.unitronics.com

The variable frequency drives optimize machine performance, save energy, and lower machine lifecycle costs across a range of applications, including packaging, conveyance and material handling, machining, pump and fan applications, and more. The system seamlessly integrates with their existing lines of programmable logic controller and human-machine interface all-in-one controllers, including UniStream®, Vision™, and Samba™. Other features include EMC built-in filters; wall, flange, and rail mounting options; extended operating range; modbus RTU fieldbus; built-in braking units, sensorless vector and torque control, safe torque off; and heavy-duty overload capacity.

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Drum handling system
Liftomatic Material Handling Inc. (Buffalo Grove, Ill.); [email protected]

 

The 3A-HD-BHDL is a fully automatic and mechanical below-hook attachment that can be used to lift 55-gal drums from an overhead position for placement to or from many containment devices, scales, pallets, or similar handling requirements. The drums remain in a vertical position while lifted and/or transported with the unit. The unit has a working capacity of up to 3000 lb/drum. The 3-point connection maintains the drum’s integrity during the lifting process. A cutting-edge “intuitive-lock” engagement system ensures the radial arms remain in the locked position until the load is placed in its final resting location. The system can be attached to any overhead lifting hoist or can be affixed to Liftomatic’s model FTB-3 forklift adapter, allowing the unit to be used from the underside of a set of forklift forks.

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Surge protection
Phoenix Contact (Middletown, Pa.); www.phoenixcontact.com

The VAL-US series offers remote status indication, which enables the user to easily monitor surge-protective devices status. The high-capacity plugs offer a high degree of protection. They are robust enough to protect devices either over time or in moments of high transients. Additionally, the plug’s key alignment prevents the plugs from being inserted into the incorrect voltage systems. The series has been developed with products specifically configured for single-phase, split-phase, three-phase, delta, and high-leg delta.

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Monitoring system
MSA Safety Inc.(Cranberry, Pa.); www.MSAsafety.com

The TriGas monitoring system featuring Ultima® X3 technology delivers a safety solution that provides reliable protection against confined space oxygen deficiency, hydrogen sulfide leaks, and combustible gases (methane). The portable design of the versatile system makes it perfect for use in confined spaces for extended time periods. With additional mounting feet and a handle, the unit can be placed near the entrance to confined space areas. It is designed to meet NFPA 820 fire protection in resource recovery facilities, OSHA 29 CFR Part 1910.148 confined space, and ANSI 2117.1-1989 safety requirements.

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Monitor
Triplepoint Environmental (Oak Park, Ill.); www.tpenv.com

The NitrOx+D process features thermally regulated nitrification–denitrification reactors that remove total nitrogen from lagoon effluent. When winter wastewater temperatures fall, the reactors heat up the water, just a few degrees, to fosters the necessary biomass to rapidly nitrify and then denitrify. The process integrates with existing infrastructure and can be configured to address biochemical oxygen demand problems while economically achieving near complete total inorganic nitrogen, nitrate, and ammonia removal at any lagoon temperature. 

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SL-DOG iOS and Android app
InfoSense Inc. (Charlotte, N.C.); www.infosense.com

The Sewer Line Data OrGanizer (SL-DOG®) iOS and Android app help field operators manage acoustic inspection data collected by the sewer line rapid assessment tool (SL-RAT®). The SL-DOG app enables operators, while in the field and conducting acoustic inspections, to simultaneously add asset identifications (IDs) and field notes in real time. The app automatically syncs any field notes into the SL-DOG cloud-based portal. This enables field operators to efficiently tie the data to specific asset IDs while streamlining back office data management.

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Water selector
Ixom Watercare Inc. (Centennial, Colo.); www.ixom.com

The Water Selector™ (patent pending) focuses on preventing source water issues from ever leaving the source and is a key part of effective raw water treatment and an integral component of a comprehensive reservoir management program. By continuously real-time monitoring reservoir water quality over the entire depth profile and allowing operators to choose the raw water they want to treat with active withdrawal control, the system will reduce chemical costs, reduce risk of negative treatment outcomes, and improve treatment facility and reservoir management capital improvement planning.

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RapiSand Plus™
WesTech Engineering (Salt Lake City); www.westech-inc.com

 

The RapiSand Plus™ package water treatment system is designed with a comprehensive process of ballasted flocculation followed by media filtration. This product innovatively combines clarification and filtration into a single unit, resulting in excellent water quality. The system is ideal for small- to medium-sized plants, which effectively treats high solids waters, flashy waters, and difficult-to-treat waters under challenging conditions.

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Multi Gas Clip Simple Plus
Gas Clip Technologies (Cedar Hill, Texas); www.gascliptech.com

The Multi Gas Clip Simple Plus is a portable four-gas detector, which runs for 3 years without charging or calibration. Sensor or battery replacement is not necessary. The infrared lower explosive limit sensor technology is the secret to the long-lasting durability of this low maintenance detector. The system reliably tests for hydrogen sulfide, carbon monoxide, oxygen, and combustible gases 24/7, even in oxygen-deficient or oxygen-enriched environments.

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Concrete inspection tool
PICA Corp. (Edmonton, Alberta, Canada); www.picacorp.com

The SeeSnake raft tool is designed for concrete cylinder pipe examination. The tool detects cylinder corrosion and wire breaks. The tool can be inserted through a manway into a drained pipe and pulled by tether to the next manway. Other features include very high resolution, and pits as small as 1 in. x 50% deep. 

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Flotation unit
Salher (Madrid, Spain); www.salher.com

The VESPA® is a fully automated compact and modular dissolved air flotation designed to treat and reduce high concentrations of suspendedmatters including solids, emulsified oil, and grease from wastewater for flows up to 20 m3/h. The system is a robust and ultra-resistant plug- and-play solution that is provided with all accessories for an optimal efficiency. The system also features an adjustable height water collector flexible to contaminating loads variations, a leveling system for installation in uneven grounds, and a transparent methacrylate cover for easy cleaning and odor-free supervision.

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Microbial testing system​
Pathogen Detection Systems Inc. (TECTA-PDS; Kingston, Ontario, Canada); www.tecta-pds.com

The TECTA-PDS core technology is the TECTA B16 testing instrument and TECTAlert individual test cartridges. This system provides fully automated microbiological testing for major water quality parameters including E. coli, total coliforms, fecal coliforms, and enterococcus. The system was developed with incredible ease of use, allowing virtually anyone to conduct advanced microbiological testing anywhere at any time. The system continually monitors the water sample and provides results at the earliest possible moment. The reporting and communications process are fully automated, with reports stored within the instrument as well as being sent via email to multiple sources.

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Butterfly valves
DelVal Flow Controls (Cypress, Texas); delvalflow.com

The Series 50 Resilient Seated Butterfly Valve features a top plate double drilled to fit ISO 5211 dimensions and standard secondary bolt circle dimensions. All handles, gear operators, and pneumatic DelTorq actuators are designed to mount directly to the company’s valves. The unique Center-LOK seat design virtually eliminates any seat movement during the seating and unseating of the disc. 

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Monitor
Pall Water (Cortland, N.Y.); www.pallwater.com

The Aria™ SMARTBOX real-time system monitor provides users with remote monitoring so they quickly understand their system’s performance anytime, anywhere, and on any device. The system provides customers with insight to system performance with intuitive dashboards, customizable historic system trends, automatic reports, and real-time alerts. The tool enables customers to proactively identify and resolve any potential issues to prevent downtime and maintain water quality.

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Meters
Badger Meter (Milwaukee); www.badgermeter.com

 

The E-Series Ultrasonic meters for commercial applications for high measurement accuracy and long-term reliability. With extended flow ranges, the meters are ideal for measuring potable cold water in commercial and industrial applications. The meters feature open flow tube design; fully electronic with programmable registration and reporting features; long-term sustained accuracy within ± 1.5% and extended flow accuracy within ± 3%.  The meters are fully submersible to withstand harsh environments and are compatibility with the company’s ORION® family of endpoints. 

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Analyzer
Electro-Chemical Devices (Anaheim, Calf.); ecdi.com

The Ammonium HYDRA-DS analyzer measures the nutrient load in rivers, streams, and lakes as well as water resource recovery facility’s aeration basins. The system determines the concentration of dissolved ammonium as nitrogen in water. The sensor uses three electrodes to determine ammonia-nitrogen, concentrations ammonium, potassium, and pH (acidity versus alkalinity levels). In addition, the analyzer operates over a wide measurement range from 0.1 to 14,000 ppm, with a T90 response time of 1 min. Accuracy is ±3% of reading (dependent on calibration). The sensors operate over a flow rate range from 0.1 to 3.0 min./section, and operating temperature range is from 32 to 122°F (0 to 50°C). 

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Valve
CORTEC (Houma, La.); www.uscortec.com

The CRV26 PRV provides a complete line of high-end valves designed and manufactured to specific project specifications. The valve is engineered to protect drilling systems against the dangers of over pressurization. The valve is suitable for frac system relief, mud pump relief, managed pressure drilling, and is compatible with API 6A and NACE MR0175 requirements.

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Disinfection sensors
Endress+Hauser (Reinach, Switzerland); www.us.endress.com

The Memosens CCS50D chlorine dioxide sensor supports safe and effective disinfection for clean drinking water, pathogen-free cooling water, and high-quality process water. The sensor features a convex membrane made of dense, dirt-repellent material, which prevents soiling and makes it extremely resistant to biofouling. Ultrasonic welding of the membrane to the sensor cap ensures its integrity, preventing dilution of the electrolyte. 

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Epoxy system
Master Bond (Hackensack, N.J.); www.masterbond.com

The EP41S-6 is a thermally stable compound possessing a glass transition temperature of 145 to 150°C and serviceability from -62 to +260°C (-80 to +500°F). the compound offers a high dielectric strength of 440 volts/mil at 75°F for a 0.125 in. thickness. The optimal cure schedule for the compound is overnight at room temperature, followed by 6 to 8 hours of heat curing at 150 to 250°F. With a mixed viscosity of 30,000 to 40,000 cps at 24°C (75°F), this compound features good flow properties, making it ideal for sealing and potting applications for electrical feedthroughs across various industries.

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Remote access solution
Moxa (Brea, Calif.); www.moxa.com

The Remote connect suite provides an easier and more secure way to connect to remote machines and equipment to perform critical troubleshooting, maintenance, data acquisition, and device management. The system is designed for industrial Internet of Things environments. The remote connection management platform includes server and client software along with a hardware gateway to seamlessly bridge the gap between field devices, engineers, and application servers for greater visibility and support. The system auto-configuration function makes installation "plug-and-play" simple with no need for extensive knowledge and no requirement to configure VPNs, perform complex firewall settings, or reconfigure IP addresses.

•••

Sensor
NewTek Sensor Solutions (Pennsauken, N.J.); www.newteksensors.com

The HT-1000 LVDTs provide a ratiometric output for reduced thermal error that results in extremely low thermal sensitivity over a wide temperature range. In addition to offering linearity of ±0.5% of full range, the system offers unlimited mechanical and electrical life as well as high reliability due to the absence of friction and contact between the core and coil. The frictionless operation of the linear position sensor combined with the induction function by which it operates, provides for truly infinite resolution, with the only limitation on resolution posed by the readability of the external electronics.

•••

Rotary screw blower
Atlas Copco Compressors LLC (Houston); www.atlascopco.com 

 

The ZS4VSD+ is designed for peak efficiency and maximum reliability through several new features. A brand-new screw element and permanent magnet motor combine to provide the most efficient compression across its entire flow range. This feature has reduced the blower’s footprint by nearly 50%.

•••

Industrial router
Siemens AG (Munich, Germany); www.siemens.com

The Scalance M804PB device allows existing machines and facilities with Simatic S7-300/S7-400 to be connected to Ethernet networks via Profibus/multi-point interfaces. Users can connect older machines and facilities directly to the Sinema remote connect management platform for remote networks. Secured communication takes place via a virtual private network tunnel, which easily can be configured and administered via Sinema remote connect. The device has totally integrated automation (TIA) portal cloud connector functionality, which enables users to easily access existing Profibus units from centrally administered engineering tools such as the TIA portal or Step 7 from version 5.5.

•••

Coupling
Krausz USA (Ocala, Fla.); www.krauszusa.com

The HYMAX GRIP 16-in. restraint coupling features only four top-facing bolts for installers to tighten and a stab-fit, one-piece design. The top-facing bolts eliminate under-digging for space to crawl under the pipe to tighten bolts while the stab-fit, one-piece design allows for easier and faster installation, eliminating such problems as losing bolts. Capable of gripping and connecting pipes with 70 t of power, the chain offers circular restraint around the pipe, unlike typical wedge-style restraints that point-load the pipe and make it weaker. The coupling can absorb post-installation dynamic pipe deflection of up to 4 degrees on each end, reducing the risk of damage and cracking due to ground shifts and temperature changes.

•••

Membrane systems
Aqua-Aerobic Systems Inc. (Loves Park, Ill.); www.aquauf.com

The Aqua-Aerobic® membrane systems feature no-break Aqua MultiBore® membranes. The systems are available in both polymeric and ceramic options. Each system is designed to effectively remove suspended solids, particulate phosphorus, viruses, and other harmful impurities resulting in safe, high quality water. Every membrane system is designed specifically for the application. The type of membrane used, polymeric or ceramic, is dependent on waste characteristics, treatment objectives, and the best economical solution. The systems are ideal for drinking water, surface water, industrial water, tertiary wastewater, and reuse applications requiring low effluent suspended solids or phosphorus.

•••

Fire hydrant
Mueller Water Products Inc. (Atlanta); www.muellerwaterproducts.com

The Super Centurion A-403 fire hydrant features a two-piece ductile iron upper barrel with a nozzle section that can be separated from the traffic section by removing two high strength bolts, making seat replacement or traffic repair simple and quick. The hydrant has a traffic flange; 5.25-in. fully encapsulated, reversible main valve; a durable polyurethane top coat; and automatic oil lubrication. In addition, all internal components, nozzles, and repair parts are fully interchangeable with the Super Centurion 250 hydrant.

•••

Ultrasonic water meter
Itron Inc. (Liberty Lake, Washington); www.itron.com

The Intelis Water Meter is the company’s first ultrasonic water metering solution, which enables utilities to take advantage of the power of data. When coupled with its multi-purpose network, the meter provides information necessary for utilities to better manage the delivery and use of water. Key features include no hardware maintenance, no moving parts, real-time intelligence, real-time alarms and flow data coupled with an open-way riva water module, and high-quality hardware. 

•••

Pumps
SPX FLOW Inc. (Frankfurt, Germany); www.spxflow.com

The ClydeUnion CUP-BB5 is the latest generation of high-pressure, multi-stage, barrel-case pump designed to the latest application programming interface specifications. The pumps comply with the most stringent global oil industry requirements. Engineered in various configurations to match process needs, the pump is ideal for applications, including seawater injection, produced water reinjection, flow-line displacement, crude oil pipeline, natural gas liquids pipeline, refinery process charging, gas treatment, boiler feed, and refined product pipeline distribution. The pump is available with opposed or inline impeller arrangements, volute or diffuser-based hydraulics, foot or centreline mounting, and a choice of construction materials from carbon steels to super duplex.

•••

Liquid-level pump controller
ATC Diversified Electronics (Newell, WVa.); www.marshbellofram.com

 

The LPC series liquid-level pump controller is an 8-pin, plug-in conductive unit that uses two probes to sense tank level and enables users to select the mode of operation — drain or fill. In drain mode (pump down), the output relay picks up and the LED turns on when liquid reaches the high-level probe. The relay drops out and the LED turns off when liquid falls below the low-level probe. In fill mode (pump up), the output relay picks up and the LED turns on when liquid falls below the low-level probe. The relay drops out and the LED turns off when liquid reaches the high-level probe.

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