October 2010, Vol. 22, No.10

Projects

PROJECTS

 

Farmington, Conn.; Jackson, Miss.; Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico; and three other cities in the United States recently enlisted the services of In-Pipe Technology Co. Inc. (Wheaton, Ill.). The In-Pipe units regularly add a high-concentration formulation of facultative, naturally occurring, nonpathogenic bacteria to strategic locations throughout the sewer system in accordance with an engineered plan. The technology is designed to begin biological treatment within the sewer system to reduce nutrient concentrations, solids production, and energy use at the treatment plant.

 

Farmington, Conn.; Jackson, Miss.; Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico; and three other cities in the United States recently enlisted the services of In-Pipe Technology Co. Inc. (Wheaton, Ill.). The In-Pipe units regularly add a high-concentration formulation of facultative, naturally occurring, nonpathogenic bacteria to strategic locations throughout the sewer system in accordance with an engineered plan. The technology is designed to begin biological treatment within the sewer system to reduce nutrient concentrations, solids production, and energy use at the treatment plant.

 

The U.S. Air Force has selected a transportable wastewater treatment and effluent-recycling system for five bases in Afghanistan. Each unit, made by Global Water Group Inc. (Dallas), is capable of processing 76,000 L/d (20,000 gal/d) and meeting the needs of 400 personnel. The systems will handle all the wastewater processing for each base. Each two-part system will be shipped in two 6-m (20-ft) containers and networked together onsite. The units are designed to produce high-quality potable water and zero solids.

 

The U.S. Agency for International Development has selected CDM (Cambridge, Mass.), a global engineering and construction firm, to develop a comprehensive water and wastewater infrastructure master plan and design, and deliver water and wastewater infrastructure improvements in Jordan. The 5-year, multisite, multiproject investment program will provide urgently needed system enhancements and improve water resources management in the next 25 years in Amman, Zarqa, Ma’an, Tafilah, and Jerash.

 

After a drought in 2006 left the high-desert community of Cloudcroft, N.M., completely without water, the town decided to adopt a fully reclaimed, recycled “zero liquid discharge” indirect potable-water-reuse system. The Cloudcroft system, provided by MIOX Corp. (Albuquerque, N.M.), uses a membrane bioreactor, a multibarrier filtration system, and an onsite sodium hypochlorite generator to treat wastewater. Natural waters from local sources will be blended in and disinfected with oxidants to better-than-drinking-water standards. The recycled water will be used for everything from irrigation and street cleaning to dishwashing and drinking.

With a permanent population of approximately 800 people that can grow to nearly 8000 during vacation season, Cloudcroft will use an onsite sodium hypochlorite generator that is designed to treat up to 760,000 L/d (200,000 gal/d) at the wastewater treatment plant and a mixed oxidant generator that is designed to treat up to 1400 m3/d (360,000 gal/d) for final disinfection to drinking water quality.

 

The Southwest Wastewater Treatment Plant in Springfield, Mo., is undergoing a $16 million improvement project. A new ozone disinfection system will reduce energy consumption, resulting in future energy savings of approximately $4 million over 20 years. The ozone system also will reduce maintenance requirements, resulting in savings of about $2 million over 20 years.

 

New York City plans to install a state-of-the-art ammonia-recovery system at the 26th Ward Wastewater Treatment Plant situated on Jamaica Bay. Plans call for the ThermoEnergy Corp. (Worcester, Mass.) CASTion Ammonia Recovery Process to prevent approximately 1 million kg (2.4 million lb) of ammonia from entering Jamaica Bay each year.

 

The City of Cincinnati is installing an ultraviolet disinfection system at the Richard Miller Water Treatment Plant. Calgon Carbon Corp. (Pittsburgh) will deliver eight 1220-mm (48-in.) reactors that will disinfect up to 908,000 m3/d (240 mgd) of drinking water. Two additional reactors have been included in the plan to allow for future growth at the plant.

 

For a 765-MW gas and steam power plant in La Brea, Trinidad, the water technology company Berkefeld (Celle, Germany) — a subsidiary of Veolia Water Solutions and Technologies (St. Maurice, France) — is supplying the process water treatment system and part of the wastewater treatment. The power plant, which is being built by Ferrostaal (Essen, Germany), will draw on a variable mixture of municipal water and condensate from the cooling towers. To accommodate this variability, the treatment processes include a storage tank with recirculation active carbon filtration to homogenize the source water, followed by a multimedia filter to eliminate solid matter and carbonate. Each of the plant’s two process trains of reverse osmosis followed by electro-deionization will produce 25 m3/h of ultrapure water for the plant.

 

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