April 2012, Vol. 24, No.4

Waterline

Combining art and infrastructure to draw the public eye

Utilities worldwide are incorporating artistic elements into infrastructure to bring water treatment to their community’s attention.

Waterfront Toronto and its government partners built Sherbourne Common, a park blending art and innovation for a neighborhoodwide stormwater treatment facility, according to a Waterfront Toronto news release. A water treatment facility in the basement of the park’s pavilion cleans collected stormwater and lake water with ultraviolet light.

Likewise, artistic murals painted on water tanks can be found across the United States. More than 75 murals painted by Donna and Rodney Hennig adorn water tanks. The Hennigs have painted desert landscapes in the Southwest and pastoral and timberland scenes in the Pacific Northwest, according to a Tnemec Co. Inc. (Kansas City, Mo.) news release. Typical water tank murals painted by the Hennigs reach 12 to 24 m (40 to 80 ft) tall and wrap around up to 201 m (660 ft) of tank diameter, the release says.

Since 1986, the artists have painted murals on new water tanks and other structures, including a 7.6 million-L (2 million-gal) tank and a 1.9 million-L (500,000-gal) tank in Oak Harbor, Wash., the news release says.

San Francisco EcoCenter exemplifies water savvy

Utilities worldwide are incorporating artistic elements into infrastructure to bring water treatment to their community’s attention.

Waterfront Toronto and its government partners built Sherbourne Common, a park blending art and innovation for a neighborhoodwide stormwater treatment facility, according to a Waterfront Toronto news release. A water treatment facility in the basement of the park’s pavilion cleans collected stormwater and lake water with ultraviolet light.

Likewise, artistic murals painted on water tanks can be found across the United States. More than 75 murals painted by Donna and Rodney Hennig adorn water tanks. The Hennigs have painted desert landscapes in the Southwest and pastoral and timberland scenes in the Pacific Northwest, according to a Tnemec Co. Inc. (Kansas City, Mo.) news release. Typical water tank murals painted by the Hennigs reach 12 to 24 m (40 to 80 ft) tall and wrap around up to 201 m (660 ft) of tank diameter, the release says.

Since 1986, the artists have painted murals on new water tanks and other structures, including a 7.6 million-L (2 million-gal) tank and a 1.9 million-L (500,000-gal) tank in Oak Harbor, Wash., the news release says.

Aging infrastructure could cost American businesses

Utilities worldwide are incorporating artistic elements into infrastructure to bring water treatment to their community’s attention.

Waterfront Toronto and its government partners built Sherbourne Common, a park blending art and innovation for a neighborhoodwide stormwater treatment facility, according to a Waterfront Toronto news release. A water treatment facility in the basement of the park’s pavilion cleans collected stormwater and lake water with ultraviolet light.

Likewise, artistic murals painted on water tanks can be found across the United States. More than 75 murals painted by Donna and Rodney Hennig adorn water tanks. The Hennigs have painted desert landscapes in the Southwest and pastoral and timberland scenes in the Pacific Northwest, according to a Tnemec Co. Inc. (Kansas City, Mo.) news release. Typical water tank murals painted by the Hennigs reach 12 to 24 m (40 to 80 ft) tall and wrap around up to 201 m (660 ft) of tank diameter, the release says.

Since 1986, the artists have painted murals on new water tanks and other structures, including a 7.6 million-L (2 million-gal) tank and a 1.9 million-L (500,000-gal) tank in Oak Harbor, Wash., the news release says.