WEF Discussions — Now on LinkedIn!

WEF is pleased to announce the creation of free LinkedIn groups associated with its technical discussion forum topics. Through these LinkedIn groups, members will be able to view and participate in discussions, as well as communicate with one another via direct messages. Share your experiences and knowledge, ask questions and respond to other discussions as frequently as you like!

You must have a LinkedIn profile to join a LinkedIn group; you can create your profile here. If you already have a LinkedIn profile, all you need to do is submit a request to join one or all of the following groups:

Water Environment Federation (Main) | Biosolids | Collection Systems | Nutrients | Stormwater 
Utility Management | Water Reuse | Water for Jobs | Watershed Management | Laboratory Practices 

RSS Feed Print
B. COLI ???
Charles Lytle
Posted: Wednesday, October 6, 2010 3:50 PM
Joined: 10/5/2009
Posts: 49


It's 1920, and your new copy of Standard Methods has just arrived....

 

What would you be doing when you determined "The Reaction" of your de-watered sludge?  What would you determine using the "Sedgwick-Rafter" method?

 

And what would these be used for:  USGS Platinum Rod-1902; English Standard Candle; Lovibond Tintometer?

 

And what tests would use these reagents:  Pear's Precipitated Fuller's Earth; Lacmoid Indicator; Tolidin Solution; Silk Bolting Cloth; Liebig's Meat Extract?

 

Now, down to basics:

 

1) give the concentration of 1 grain/US gallon in more modern units

2) what was Clark's Scale used for?

3) what molar concentration is N/2 hydrochloric acid?

4) what in the world is B. COLI?

 

Chuck Lytle


Anonymous
Posted: Thursday, October 7, 2010 7:08 AM

Most of this stuff I can't even begin to hazard a guess.  I could google it but I feel that would be cheating.  My only guesses are that the platinum rod is used in the preparation of color standards, the tintometer is used to read said standards, the meat extract is used as a broth or agar substrate for one of the microbiology methods, and N/2 HCl is 6 molar.  How close am I?


dsmith
Posted: Thursday, October 7, 2010 7:09 AM
Joined: 12/31/2009
Posts: 40


This forum really needs to prompt you to log-in if posting as anonymous.  The previous reply is me.


GSain
Posted: Thursday, October 7, 2010 7:30 AM
Joined: 8/4/2010
Posts: 6


These are all guesses, google was not used.

Rounding off, I believe 1 grain/gallon would be about 17 mg/l.  IIRC, there are 7000 grains to a lb, based on the weight of a "standard" barley corn.

The English Standard Candle was used for turbidity measurements.

Based on my homebrewing knowledge, I"m guessing the Lovibond tintometer was for some type of color determination.

Another guess from memory, Sedgwick-Rafter was a microscope slide marked off in gradations to help in counting colonies?

N/2 HCL would be a 0.5 normal solution of HCL.


dsmith
Posted: Tuesday, October 19, 2010 4:16 PM
Joined: 12/31/2009
Posts: 40


So, Charles, are you going to provide the answers to this or not?  I'm kind of anxious.


Charles Lytle
Posted: Monday, January 31, 2011 12:54 PM
Joined: 10/5/2009
Posts: 49


GSain goes to the head of the class.

 

For all of this and more, stay tuned for an upcoming edition of WEF's Laboratory Solutions where all will be revealed.

 

How about analyzing for lead, copper, and zinc in a water sample using a couple of chemicals, filter paper, a balance, a battery, and some Nessler tubes?

 

Ah, the good old days when chemists were CHEMISTS.

 

Chuck Lytle


Anonymous
Posted: Monday, March 7, 2011 2:01 PM

For those inquiring minds who have to know, I just discovered in the latest edition of Laboratory Equipment that the Lovibond Tintometer is still made.  From the picture, it looks very high tech.

 

See for yourself at www.lovibond.com

 

Chuck Lytle


Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, June 26, 2011 7:14 PM
I can't believe I've been going for years wihtout knowing that.
Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, June 26, 2011 11:26 PM
Whoa, thgins just got a whole lot easier.
Anonymous
Posted: Sunday, June 26, 2011 11:30 PM
Got it! Thanks a lot again for hlpenig me out!
Anonymous
Posted: Monday, June 27, 2011 12:18 PM
Ya learn something new evedyary. It's true I guess!
Anonymous
Posted: Monday, June 27, 2011 1:02 PM
Great thinking! That really bareks the mold!