New EPA Report Shows Value of Water to U.S. Economy

By Dr. Eileen O’Neill
Posted Nov. 6, 2013
 

 

Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released The Importance of Water in the US Economy, a report that directly addresses areas WEF and its members care very much about. As you may know, WEF is part of the Value of Water Coalition, and our primary objective is to help Americans understand the real value of water. 

In October, the Coalition launched a public awareness campaign focusing on where our nation’s water comes from, where it goes, how much water households use and how investing in water infrastructure today can help ensure safe water for future generations
http://thevalueofwater.org. 


The EPA report takes a step back and attempts to quantify the impact of water on the U.S. economy as a whole, taking into account factors like water quality, mode of delivery and the volume of the source from which the water was supplied. The report shows that water is fundamental to the U.S. economy, allowing us to produce energy and food. But while everything in the economy relies – directly or indirectly – on the availability of abundant, clean water, the most striking finding of the report is that it’s tough to find data that accurately reflects water’s true worth in the economy:

“...Available price data fail to indicate water’s true worth, and may encourage inefficient and potentially unsustainable use of the resource.” –
The Importance of Water to the U.S. Economy, U.S. EPA 

Which might not be such a big problem, except that the report also finds that competition for scarce water resources is on the rise, due to increasing populations, decreasing water quality, and the effects of climate change. Better data may help alleviate some of these pressures, by allowing public water systems and management agencies to make decisions informed by reliable data. 

The report points out that “every sector of the U.S. economy is influenced by water,” which is why it is critical that everyone – from regular Americans to decision and policymakers – recognize how important our water systems and resources really are. 

I encourage you to review and share the
report and to use the data in your communications efforts. Together we can spread the word about the true value of this amazing resource. 

 11/06/2013Permanent link

New EPA Report Shows Value of Water to U.S. Economy  ()
 

New EPA Report Shows Value of Water to U.S. Economy By Dr. Eileen O’NeillPosted Nov. 6, 2013    Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released The Importance of Water in the US Economy, a report that directly addresses areas

Comments (0)


New EPA Report Shows Value of Water to U.S. Economy

 Permanent link

New EPA Report Shows Value of Water to U.S. Economy

By Dr. Eileen O’Neill
Posted Nov. 6, 2013
 

 

Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released The Importance of Water in the US Economy, a report that directly addresses areas WEF and its members care very much about. As you may know, WEF is part of the Value of Water Coalition, and our primary objective is to help Americans understand the real value of water. 

In October, the Coalition launched a public awareness campaign focusing on where our nation’s water comes from, where it goes, how much water households use and how investing in water infrastructure today can help ensure safe water for future generations
http://thevalueofwater.org. 


The EPA report takes a step back and attempts to quantify the impact of water on the U.S. economy as a whole, taking into account factors like water quality, mode of delivery and the volume of the source from which the water was supplied. The report shows that water is fundamental to the U.S. economy, allowing us to produce energy and food. But while everything in the economy relies – directly or indirectly – on the availability of abundant, clean water, the most striking finding of the report is that it’s tough to find data that accurately reflects water’s true worth in the economy:

“...Available price data fail to indicate water’s true worth, and may encourage inefficient and potentially unsustainable use of the resource.” –
The Importance of Water to the U.S. Economy, U.S. EPA 

Which might not be such a big problem, except that the report also finds that competition for scarce water resources is on the rise, due to increasing populations, decreasing water quality, and the effects of climate change. Better data may help alleviate some of these pressures, by allowing public water systems and management agencies to make decisions informed by reliable data. 

The report points out that “every sector of the U.S. economy is influenced by water,” which is why it is critical that everyone – from regular Americans to decision and policymakers – recognize how important our water systems and resources really are. 

I encourage you to review and share the
report and to use the data in your communications efforts. Together we can spread the word about the true value of this amazing resource. 

Posted by Blaine Menelik at 11/06/2013 03:12:51 PM | 


Comments

/uploadedImages/Blogs/Authors/Eileen O'Neill.jpgPosted by:
Eileen O'Neill, Ph.D.
Executive Director, Water Environment Federation
 

Eileen O’Neill is the Executive Director of the Water Environment Federation (WEF), an international organization of more than 36,000 water quality professionals headquartered in Alexandria, Va.

Most recently WEF's deputy executive director, Dr. O’Neill has worked with the Federation for just over 20 years in a variety of positions including with responsibility for oversight of WEF’s technical, international, and communications programs and served as the organization’s chief technical officer before becoming deputy executive director in late 2011.

Before joining WEF she worked as an academic and in environmental consulting in the US and in Europe.  She has a B.S. in Soil Science from the University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne (UK) and a Ph.D. in Soil Science from the University of Aberdeen (U.K.) and undertook a postdoctoral traineeship in Environmental Toxicology at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.
 


<< December 2014 >>
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31      

Blog Roll

Archive

Recent Posts