Celebrating the CWA's 40th Anniversary

By Jeff Eger
Posted October 19, 2012
 

I was proud to represent the Water Environment Federation at an event we sponsored with the National Association of Clean Water Agencies and the Association of Clean Water Administrators to celebrate the Clean Water Act’s 40th anniversary on Monday, October 15, at the National Press Club in Washington. WEF members were at the forefront of CWA implementation, when innovative thinking was essential to providing the clean and safe water we enjoy today, and they’ll be instrumental in building on CWA success over the next 40 years.

 

If we are going to continue to provide essential services and make progress in water quality, we need to encourage innovation once again. For example, WEF is focusing on transformation of the water sector’s energy performance and we have developed a ‘road map to net-zero energy’ for use by utilities planning to transition from energy consumers to energy producers.

 

We also need innovative financing, because investment in water infrastructure creates jobs and safeguards public health. Despite the significant improvements made under the Clean Water Act and the fact that the U.S. has some of the most advanced treatment systems, much of its water and wastewater infrastructure was built more than a century ago. WEF is leading an effort this election season to send a clear message to U.S. elected officials and political candidates that investment in water infrastructure is an investment in America’s future.  Along with our Member Associations, our friends at NACWA, and other national partners, WEF is making the business case for water infrastructure investment by emphasizing the irrefutable link between water infrastructure investment and job creation. It’s called the Water for Jobs campaign, and you can find out more at waterforjobs.org.

 

In addition to funding, we need to look at the Clean Water Act to see if there are ways to provide flexibility for the implementation of watershed-level solutions, while still making progress on our national goals.  WEF is committed to working with our partners, EPA, and other stakeholders to develop and promote recommendations for "modernizing" the Clean Water Act.  We need both the funding and the flexibility to protect future public health, create jobs, and support a sound national economy.

 

 

 10/19/2012Permanent link

Celebrating the CWA’s 40th Anniversary  ()
 

Posted Oct. 19, 2012 

 

I was proud to represent the Water Environment Federation at an event we sponsored with the National Association of Clean Water Agencies and the Association of Clean Water Administrators to celebrate the Clean Water Act’s 40th anniversary at the National Press Club in Washington. WEF members were at the forefront of CWA implementation, when innovative thinking was essential to providing the clean and safe water we enjoy today, and they’ll be instrumental in building on CWA success over the next 40 years.

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Celebrating the CWA’s 40th Anniversary

 Permanent link

Celebrating the CWA's 40th Anniversary

By Jeff Eger
Posted October 19, 2012
 

I was proud to represent the Water Environment Federation at an event we sponsored with the National Association of Clean Water Agencies and the Association of Clean Water Administrators to celebrate the Clean Water Act’s 40th anniversary on Monday, October 15, at the National Press Club in Washington. WEF members were at the forefront of CWA implementation, when innovative thinking was essential to providing the clean and safe water we enjoy today, and they’ll be instrumental in building on CWA success over the next 40 years.

 

If we are going to continue to provide essential services and make progress in water quality, we need to encourage innovation once again. For example, WEF is focusing on transformation of the water sector’s energy performance and we have developed a ‘road map to net-zero energy’ for use by utilities planning to transition from energy consumers to energy producers.

 

We also need innovative financing, because investment in water infrastructure creates jobs and safeguards public health. Despite the significant improvements made under the Clean Water Act and the fact that the U.S. has some of the most advanced treatment systems, much of its water and wastewater infrastructure was built more than a century ago. WEF is leading an effort this election season to send a clear message to U.S. elected officials and political candidates that investment in water infrastructure is an investment in America’s future.  Along with our Member Associations, our friends at NACWA, and other national partners, WEF is making the business case for water infrastructure investment by emphasizing the irrefutable link between water infrastructure investment and job creation. It’s called the Water for Jobs campaign, and you can find out more at waterforjobs.org.

 

In addition to funding, we need to look at the Clean Water Act to see if there are ways to provide flexibility for the implementation of watershed-level solutions, while still making progress on our national goals.  WEF is committed to working with our partners, EPA, and other stakeholders to develop and promote recommendations for "modernizing" the Clean Water Act.  We need both the funding and the flexibility to protect future public health, create jobs, and support a sound national economy.

 

 

Posted by Jon Byus at 10/19/2012 10:23:38 AM | 


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Eger189.jpgPosted by:
Jeff Eger, WEF Executive Director

Prior to joining the Water Environment Federation as executive director in 2011, Jeff Eger served as executive director of Sanitation District 1 (SD1) in Kentucky since 1994. SD1 is the second largest public sewer utility in that state and maintains $1 billion in physical assets that include more than 1,600 miles of sanitary sewer line, 143 wastewater pumping stations, 15 flood pump stations, eight package treatment plants, two major wastewater treatment plants with a third under construction, more than 250 miles of storm sewer and more than 17,800 sewer structures. Career highlights of his tenure include supervision of the regionalization of 30 municipal sanitary sewer systems in response to pending Federal environmental regulations and legislative changes; responsibility for development and implementation of a regional storm water management program to comply with Federal regulations, and negotiating a unique watershed-based Consent Decree with state and federal officials that outlines a strategic 20-year plan for addressing sewer overflows in Northern Kentucky. He also initiated the design and construction of two new regional wastewater treatment plants and secured more than $80 million in low interest, state revolving loan funds to help finance the construction of these facilities, reducing costs to local rate payers.

Jeff is former chairman of the Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission and has been active in numerous other professional and civic service endeavors such as the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, the National Association of Clean Water Agencies, the Gateway Community and Technical College Foundation, the Bluegrass State Skills Commission, and the Kentucky Literacy Commission. He is Outstanding Alumnus of Northern Kentucky University (graduated 1994, Bachelor of Arts, Communications).


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